English 110

Winter 2020 ENGLISH 110 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

11105  ENGL 110-001 Topic: Evildoers in Literature     7:30-8:20 am TWR

Dr. Deborah Hoffmann                        Deborah.Hoffmann@uregina.ca

 

Description to come.

11106  ENGL 110-002 Topic: Irish Fiction     10:00-11:15 am MW

Bev Montague                                Bev.Montague@uregina.ca

Ireland seems always to look in two directions: backward to its rich history and mythology, and forward to its role as a vital presence in the new Europe. Although many contemporary Irish writers have attempted to leave behind the preoccupations of their literary antecedents, the spectres of British occupation, of famine and the resulting diaspora, continue to haunt them. Ireland is a country that epitomizes dichotomy: Catholic and Protestant, native Irish and colonizing English, North and South. This course examines a number of works, both short fiction and novels, that illustrate this duality.

11107  ENGL 110-003 Topic: Speculative Fiction     2:30-3:45 pm TR

Dr. Anne James                            Anne.James@uregina.ca

In this class our primary reading will be Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy, three works of speculative fiction that take us from creation stories to the imagined end of the world as we know it. These novels provide opportunities to think critically about issues that affect us: climate change, environmental destruction, social breakdown, genetic manipulation, animal rights, and the possibility of being replaced by a whole new species. Writing assignments will culminate in a research essay. 

 

11108  ENGL 110-004  Topic: Sympathy for the Devil  12:30-1:20 pm MWF

Jean Hillabold               Jean.Hillabold@uregina.ca

This course will focus on four novels about supernatural male protagonists by women authors. Each central character in these novels is described (often by himself) as a “monster” or a “devil,” and each has a secret which would make him socially unacceptable if widely known, yet each of them undercuts the traditional role of the villain as a stereotyped embodiment of evil. These characters emerge as both exotic and sympathetic for the human reader.  The four novels will be discussed in terms of traditional obstacles to the publication of work by women, and the current boom in women’s writing and speculative fiction. You will be encouraged to develop and apply your own writing skills to an analysis of the novels.

 

11112  ENGL 110-397 Topic: War Literature: Military Maculinities  WEB  

Justine Gieni              Justine.Gieni@uregina.ca

For centuries, warfare has been seen as a rite of passage and proving ground, whereby boys become men by performing their patriotic duty. However, for many soldiers, the realities of warfare and constraints of a patriarchal-military system prove to be traumatic and destructive. Whether referred to as “shellshock,” “soldier’s heart” “nervous disorder” “combat fatigue” “hysteria” or PTSD – the effects of war are apparent in the lives of soldiers who exhibit symptoms that range from nightmares to paralysis, nervous tics to the “thousand yard stare.” In this course, we will discuss literary and cinematic narratives that represent the interconnections between war trauma and hegemonic masculinity in novels by Timothy Findley, Chang-rae Lee, Roy Scranton and Stanley Kubrick’s film Full Metal Jacket.

11113  ENGL 110-991  Topic: Literature of Cyberculture  7:00-9:45 pm  M

Chris Gbekorbu-Matters              Email: URCourses

There is a curse that goes “May you live in interesting times.” With rapid and interesting developments in genetic engineering, robotics, information technology, and nanotechnology (GRIN technologies), humanity may in fact be cursed. Genetic engineering allows us to mix traits of various species from organisms that would not otherwise exist in nature while robotics frees us from monotonous or dangerous tasks that we would rather not perform. Information technology (the Web and its various helper technologies) grant us access to vast stores of data and information that were unimaginable only a few generations ago, while nanotechnology allows us to manipulate matter itself at a fundamental level and physically alter the world around us with exacting precision. This course will examine some of the effects these technologies may have on humanity. In addition, the course will continue to build upon the essay-writing skills developed in English 100.

11114/15    ENGL 110-C01/C02  Topic: Western Canadian Fiction 1:00-2:15 pm TR

Dr. Christian Riegel       Christian.Riegel@uregina.ca

Description to Come.

 

11116/17    ENGL 110-C03/C04  Topic: Women's Gothic Nightmares 9:30-10:20 am MWF

Dr. Susan Bauman       Susan.Bauman@uregina.ca

Description to Come


11118/19    ENGL 110-C05/C06  Topic: Horrors of the Mind 11:30-12:20 am MWF

Dr. Susan Bauman       Susan.Bauman@uregina.ca

Description to Come

 

11120/21    ENGL 110-C07/C08  Children’s Fantasy Literature 10:00-11:15 am TR

Kathryn MacLennan       Kathryn.MacLennan@uregina.ca

Did you love the Harry Potter series and want to read more books like it? If so, this class is for you! We will study Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, and The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander. We will look at the mythological elements used in the novels, particularly the idea of an archetypal hero, as well as how these novels fit into a tradition of children’s literature.

 

11122   ENGL 110-L01   Topic: Mass Media and Misinformation  10:00-11:15 am TR

Michael Horacki                           Michael.Horacki@uregina.ca

Description to Come

 

11123  ENGL 110-L02   Topic: Transgressive Fiction 10:00-11:15 am  WF

Scott Wilson                               Scott.Wilson@uregina.ca

Description to Come

 

11124 ENGL 110-L03 Children's Fantasy Literature 9:30-10:20 am MWF

Kathryn MacLennan       Kathryn.MacLennan@uregina.ca

Did you love the Harry Potter series and want to read more books like it? If so, this class is for you! We will study Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, and The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander. We will look at the mythological elements used in the novels, particularly the idea of an archetypal hero, as well as how these novels fit into a tradition of children’s literature.

11125 ENGL 110-L04   Topic: TBA   11:30-12:45  TR

Benjamin Salloum            Benjamin.Salloum@uregina.ca

Description to Come

 

11126 ENGL 110-L05   Topic: Engineering Souls: Biology, Technology & Humanity   10:00-11:15 am  TR

Dr. Noel Chevalier            Noel.Chevalier@uregina.ca

Description to Come

 

11127 ENGL 110-L06   Topic: J.R.R. Tolkien   7:00-9:45 pm  M

Description to Come

 

11128 ENGL 110-L07   Topic: Modernism and the East   9:30-10:20 am  MWF

TBA

11129/30 ENGL 110-S01/S02   Topic: TBA   11:30-12:45  TR

TBA

11131/32 ENGL 110-S03/04   Topic: TBA   9:30-10:20 am  MWF

TBA