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Course Descriptions

HIST 113 - Issues in Canadian History
An exploration of major themes, periods and events in Canadian History, this course introduces students to the methods and sources of historical study and familiarizes them with significant historical developments from the Canadian past. *Note: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 101, 102, 103 or 113.*

HIST 114 - Issues in the History of the Americas
An exploration of major themes, periods and events in the history of the Americas, this course introduces students to the methods and sources of historical study, familiarizes them with significant developments in the history of the Americas and encourages them to compare the historical experiences of various American peoples. *Note: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 104, 112 or 114*

HIST 115 - Issues in European History
An exploration of major themes, periods and events in European history, this course introduces students to the methods and sources of historical study, familiarizes them with significant developments in the history of Europe and places that history in a global context. *Note: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 106, 107, 108 or 115.*

HIST 116 - Issues in World History
An exploration of major themes, periods and events in World History, this course introduces students to the methods and sources of historical study, familiarizes them with significant historical developments in global history, and encourages them to make comparisons between civilizations. *Note: Students may only receive credit for one of HIST 116, HIST 107, or HIST 105.*

HIST 150 - Today’s World: Historical Perspectives
This course explores the influence of the past on the world in which we live. Topics addressed will be taken from today’s headlines and will reflect a wide variety of periods and geographical areas. Topics may include terrorism, environmentalism, war, demonstrations, popular culture, the welfare state, global crises.

HIST 200 - Canada Before Confederation
A survey of Canadian history from the pre-Contact era to Confederation. Topics include Indigenous history before European colonisation, New France, the Conquest, Canada and the American Revolution, British North America, Indigenous and Métis peoples of the Northwest, and the background to Confederation. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level History course or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 201 - Canada From Confederation to World War II
A survey of Canadian history from Confederation to the outbreak of World War II including such topics as John A. Macdonald's National Policy, western settlement, the rise of urban, industrial Canada, the impact of World War I, society and politics during the 1920s and the Great Depression. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level History Course or completion of 15 credit hours *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 205 and HIST 206. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 201 and either of HIST 205 or HIST 206. *

HIST 202 - Canada from World War II to the Present
A survey of the making of modern Canada since 1939, including such topics as the building of the welfare state, Canadian foreign policy, the military in war and peacekeeping, Quebec separatism, the women's movement, Aboriginal rights, the new constitution and Charter of Rights, the economy and free trade. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 207. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 202 and HIST 207. *

HIST 225 - Tudor and Stuart Britain
Topics include the Tudors, the Protestant Reformation, the growing power of parliament and its changing relationship with the king, the role of religion in early modern society, popular belief and the Civil War. We will also look at the Revolution of 1688 and its implications for the British constitution. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 221 and HIST 222. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 225 and either of HIST 221 and HIST 222. *

HIST 226 - The Powerful versus the Poor: the Evolution of Modern Britain
Topics include the slave trade and the rise of the abolitionist movement, the loss of the American colonies and Britain's response (both radical and conservative) to the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Reform Act of 1832, the Irish Potato Famine, and Britain's experience in the two world wars. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 223. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 226 and HIST 223. *

HIST 231 - The American Colonies and the United States before 1865
Examination of such topics as colonial life; Anglo-Native relations; the Revolutionary era; economy, politics, religion, reform, and society in the early republic; antebellum America; slavery and race relations; gender and family issues; westward expansion, war, and diplomacy and the American Civil War. *** Prerequisite: One 100 Level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours. ***

HIST 233 - African American History Since 1783
Examines modern African American history, analyzing culture, gender and social relations throughout the nineteenth/twentieth century United States. Areas of study include events leading up to the Civil War and its aftermath; early struggles for civic equality; the emergence of a modern civil rights movement and the radicalization of social protest. ***Prerequisite: One 100-level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 234 - The United States, 1865-1941
Topics covered include Western expansion and development; growth of the urban industrial order; immigration/ethnicity; African Americans; gender issues; society and culture; regionalism; politics; emergence of the United States as a world power from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of U.S. involvement in World War ll. *** Prerequisite: One 100 Level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours. ***

HIST 235 - The United States Since 1941
Topics covered include America as a global power; domestic impact of the Cold War; politics; economic transformation; regionalism; African Americans; ethnic America; gender issues; social movements; society and culture. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 239 - A History of the Cowboy
The cowboy has served as a central masculine archetype in the Americas since horses were introduced. Not only of historical significance empirically in Argentina, Mexico, and the United States, culturally the cowboy¿s influence has reached from Hollywood to the White House, the Pampas to Chihuahua. This course explores why. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 250 - Modern Dragons: Revolutionary China and Japan
This course aims to impart an understanding of modernization processes in East Asia from the nineteenth century to the 1980s. Attention is focused on how China and Japan addressed the western-led challenge of modernization. Emphasis is also placed on social and economic change. ***Prerequisite: 100-level History course or completion of 15 credit hours *** *Note: Formerly numbered HIST 105. Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 105 or 250.*

HIST 252 - Late Imperial China: Social and Economic History
Focuses on the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) and the Qing dynasty (1644-1912), when the traditional political, social, and economic institutions of China reached their fullest development. ***Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 255 - Japan of the Samurai
Examines Japan from medieval times up to the middle of the nineteenth century. Discussion will cover the political, social, economic as well as cultural developments of each period with emphasis on the means by which groups and individuals acquired and attempted to maintain their influence over others. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 256 - History of Modern Japan
Examines the search for a new national identity in modern Japan through an analysis of political, social, economic and cultural changes from 1868 to the 1970s. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 260 - Earliest Civilizations
An introduction, emphasizing the use of archaeological data, to the rise and development of the oldest civilizations in the Eastern Hemisphere, particularly those of Mesopotamia and Egypt. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 261 - Introduction to Ancient Greece
This course introduces students to the history of ancient Greece. The emphasis is on social, political, cultural and military themes, from the Bronze Age through to the Hellenistic Period. *** Prerequisite: One 100-level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours *** *Note: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 261 or 264*

HIST 262 - Introduction to Ancient Rome
This course introduces students to the history of ancient Rome. The emphasis is on social, political, cultural and military themes, from the Regnal Period (c. 750-510 BC) through to the Principate (c. 31 BC-AD 300). *** Prerequisite: One 100-level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours *** *Note: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 262 or 264*

HIST 265 - Early Middle Ages 300-1100
This course covers the emergence of medieval Europe out of Roman, Germanic, and Christian influences. Topics include the Viking attacks, the rise of the Christian Church, the decline and revival of urban life, the "King Arthur" controversy, and the development of kingdoms and empires. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 266 - Western Europe in the Later Middle Ages, 1100-1400
The themes of this course include: the Crusades, heresies, Church reform, universities and learning, chivalry and courtly love, towns and trade, intensification of anti-Semitism, developments in religion, art and architecture, monarchies and government, the Black Death, the Papacy, and Church-state relations. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 270 - Europe, 1400-1648: Renaissance and Reformation
This course examines the Italian Renaissance in art, culture and thought; overseas explorations; Protestant and Catholic Reformations; rise of the nation state; the Thirty Years War; the Scientific Revolution. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 271 - Health, Disease and the Body: The History of Medicine in Western Culture
This course surveys the history of medicine by exploring how concepts of healing, disease, and the body have changed over time. Themes to be explored include: the role of magic and religion in healing, social impact of contagious disease, gender and reproduction, mental illness, and the development of medical professions. ***Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 272 - Gender and the Body in Early Modern Europe
This course examines the social history of Europe from the 15th to the 18th centuries through a focus on issues related to gender, sexuality and the body. It includes topics such as: gender definitions, marriage and family, sexuality and morality, and clothing and fashion. *** Prerequisite: One 100-level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 275 - Nineteenth Century Europe
Industrialization, urbanization, science, ideological conflicts; Congress of Vienna, Concert of Europe, revolutions of 1848-49; unifications of Italy and Germany; Napoleon III; Imperialism, origins of the First World War. *** Prerequisite: 100 level History course or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 277 - Europe, 1648-1815: Absolutism and Revolution
This course surveys the varieties of absolutism under the old regime, the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire. It also considers the rise of the public sphere, the beginnings of industrial revolution and changing attitudes toward crime and poverty. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 274 and HIST 275. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 277 and either of HIST 274 and HIST 275. *

HIST 278 - Twentieth Century Europe
First World War, revolutions, peace treaties; League of Nations; fascism, nazism, the Spanish Civil War; causes and consequences of the Second World War; divided Europe since 1945. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 276. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 278 and HIST 276. Web delivered class sections may be subject to an additional $50.00 material fee. *

HIST 286 - The Russian Empire Since Ivan the Terrible
Ivan the Terrible and the expansion of Muscovy, Peter the Great and Europeanization, Enlightened absolutism, Russian nationalism, the Russian Revolution, the consolidation of the Soviet Union, the impact of two World Wars, the Cold War, the break up of the Soviet Empire and the reassertion of nationalities and their identities. ****Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 290AC - First Nations and the Colonization of the Americas
This course examines the ways in which Native peoples in North, Meso-, and South America responded to the European colonization of the Americas between roughly 1500 and 1800 and explores the legacy of early modern colonialism for indigenous peoples and nation-states of the western hemisphere. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level History course or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 290AM - A History of Canadian Disasters
Students will explore major disasters that shook the nation throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Through an examination of a variety of ‘natural’ disasters, including fires, floods, and severe storms to human-made disasters, such as explosions, crashes, and spills, this course will highlight the relationship between all levels of government, big business, and charities when responding to disasters. By investigating the argument that there is no such thing as a ‘natural’ disaster, students will gain insight into Canadian federalism, humanitarianism, big business, and technological advances. ***Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 290AN - History of Africa
An introduction to the histories and diverse cultures of Africa from the earliest times to the era of colonization in the 19th century. Attention is given to the roots of African peoples in antiquity, processes of regional differentiation, and evolving patterns of trade, politics and conflict. ***Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 290AO - A Social History of North America through Film and Television
From examining silent films and the advent of ‘talkies’ to digital streaming in the twenty-first century, this course provides an examination of the social history of North America through film. Drawing on films and television shows, this course explores issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality. ***Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 290AP - The French Resistance During World War II
While General de Gaulle represented an early form of resistance to Nazi rule, for many who later joined the underground, it was less clear just how collaborationist the Vichy Government truly was under Marshal Petain. This course will examine the crystallization and course of this resistance, from its earliest existence. ***Prerequisite: One 100-level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 290AR - History of Love, Emotions, and Sexuality
Have you ever wondered how the Romans, Greeks, Egyptians, and Aztecs, experienced love? How was sexuality understood and exercised? Looking at examples from across world history, this course will explore how emotions, love, and sexuality have influenced political decisions, cultural developments, artistic manifestations, and religious beliefs. ***Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 290AT - The Second Crusade: Holy War and the Crusading Movement in the 12th Century
This course will explore the background to and outcomes of the Second Crusade in the context of the crusading movement in the twelfth century. We will be using role-playing game techniques to allow students to take on the roles of participants in the 1148 war council at Acre. ***Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 290AU - The Black Death: A Medieval Pandemic
The Black Death was a major pandemic that devastated Asia, Europe, and North Africa in the fourteenth century. This course explores the social, economic, religious, and cultural effects of the pandemic on medieval people. It also looks at how modern-day historians and scientists try to learn about this disease outbreak. ***Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 290AV - China Since Mao
Examines social and economic change in China since the Cultural Revolution and the death of Mao Zedong in 1976. Using both chronological and thematic approaches it explores such phenomena as urbanization, environmental challenges, mass media, education, and censorship. The evolution of distinctive features of China's political system is also explored. ***Prerequisite: One 100-level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 290AW - Popping the Bubble: Morality and Discourse in the Digital Age
Why is it so difficult to discuss morally charged topics with someone who sits across the ideological aisle from you? And how does social media change those discussions further? This course will unpack the psychology and philosophy behind moral reasoning and the ways in which digital media impact these processes. *** Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours ***

HIST 290AX - History of Rock and Roll
The History of Rock and Roll seeks to understand the rise of this important genre. Music emerges as an artistic expression of its period and can be influenced by new ideologies, events, technology, and socio-political developments. Rock and Roll has survived as a clearly defined genre that remains universally popular. ***Prerequisite: One 100 level HIST or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 290AY - British Colonialism and its Decline
This course looks at British imperial expansion and subsequent decolonization. In the nineteenth century Britain was at the height of its power and wealth. British prosperity came at the expense of colonized subjects who were denied citizenship and good working conditions. Topics include colonialism in India, Africa, and the Caribbean. ***Prerequisite: One 100-level HIST course or completion of 15 credit hours***

HIST 301 - Federalism and the Canadian Experience
This course studies the origins, structure, and evolution of Canadian federalism. It focuses on the relationship between Ottawa and the provinces, and considers several themes: Confederation, regionalism and province-building, federal-provincial relations, the role of the courts, constitutional development, the welfare state, fiscal arrangements and economic policy, and contemporary issues. ***Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours*** *Note: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 301 or PSCI 331*

HIST 303 - Canada in the World
This course examines the history of Canadian Foreign Policy and considers Canada¿s place on the international stage. It also investigates how various political leaders managed Canada's involvement in international affairs from Confederation to the present. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 307 - Social History of the "Sixties" in North America
From the "beats" of the 1950s to the fall of Saigon in 1975, baby-boomer youth transformed society through the counterculture, sexual revolution, the new left, student power, environmentalism, and liberation movements, making the "Sixties" the homeland of today. The course compares the Canadian and US experiences of this turbulent era. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 314 - The Legal History of Canada
Aboriginal approaches to law; colonial regimes and the arrival of European law; the development of modern institutions; individual, group, and majority rights in a democratic society. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 213. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 314 and HIST 213. *

HIST 318 - History of the Prairie West
The course will survey the history of the Prairie West from the pre-contact period to the 21st century. Topics will include: Native history, the fur trade, Canadian westward expansion, the Batoche resistance, settlement, the wheat economy, the 'Dirty Thirties,' the world wars, the resource boom and the New West. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 211. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 318 and HIST 211. *

HIST 319 - History in a Digital World
This course considers history in the digital era, focusing on how to do digital research and how to create digital resources. Questions regarding access, the marginalization of non-digital resources, and the roles of social media and Big Tech are addressed. This course builds skills in digital research and content creation. ***Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours.***

HIST 321 - The Politics of Crowds: Popular Protest in Britain since 1700
The course deals with the political, economic, nationalist and religious motivations of protest; bread riots, the Gordon riots, and the Chartist movement; twentieth-century protest, including the movement for nuclear disarmament, student and anti-Vietnam War protest and the anti-war protest of 2003. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or 30 credit hours ***

HIST 322 - Sex and the City: the Pursuit of Pleasure in Britain since 1500
Topics include early modern erotica, libertines, the royal mistresses of Charles II, the city and sexual danger, prostitution, Victorian repression, abortion and birth control, twentieth-century liberal attitudes toward sexuality, the impact of sex manuals and sex education, the sexual revolution, and the articulation of a gay and lesbian identity *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or 30 credit hours ***

HIST 323 - Crime and Punishment in Britain since 1500
Themes include the English justice system and the criminal underworld, the "bloody code" (eighteenth-century Britain's having more capital offences than any other European country), the rise of the prison, crime reporting, the popularity of genres like detective fiction, changing notions of responsibility for crime and the rise of forensic science. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 330 - Women in Canadian History
Explores the lives of women in Canada's past. We look at some of this country’s most famous women, including Pauline Johnson and Nellie McClung, but we also study the experiences of those who did not become famous, and in fact lived on the margins for most of their lives. ***Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours***

HIST 332 - United States Foreign Relations in the Twentieth Century
This course emphasizes the emergence of the United States as a world power, and its growing military, economic, and cultural dominance in the course of the twentieth century. Of special concern are United States relations with Europe, Asia and the Middle East and its increasing hegemony in the Western Hemisphere. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 333 - The History of Chicago, America's Second City
Examines urban development in one of America's most racially and ethnically diverse cities. This course analyzes Chicago history from its early-nineteenth century origins of cultural conflict and environmental achievements, to its turn-of-the-century growth as a site of progressive reform, to its more recent struggles with racial/ethnic divides and political corruption. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 334 - Gender in Modern America
This course will examine the ways in which race, ethnicity, class, region, and sexuality have shaped ideas about gender and gender ideals in the United States since the Civil War, as well as how these beliefs changed over time and were contested throughout modern U.S. history. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 348 - Imperialism in Latin America
This course investigates the several waves of imperialism that have swept the region, beginning with Christopher Columbus in 1492. It explores the various motivations for colonization, indigenous responses to the aggressions, and assesses the diverse effects of colonialism. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 352 - Shanghai and Tokyo
Compares the complex social, economic, cultural and political changes in these Asian cities since the first era of contact with the West. Themes include the development of a "new" urban lifestyle built around a rapidly-expanding middle class, the growth of a politicized urban proletariat and new roles for women. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 356 - Japanese Imperialism in China, Korea and Taiwan
This course explores processes of action and reaction in Japanese imperialism. Themes include: theoretical and historical motivations for imperial expansion, managing colonial societies, the economics of empire, the integration of settler communities, the culture of empire (particularly two-way culture flows), and the legacy of empire. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 368 - The History of Popular Religion in the Middle Ages (300-1400)
This course will examine, from an historical perspective, the religious beliefs and practices of medieval Europeans. The emphasis will be on Christian beliefs, but those of other religions will be considered, too. Topics include: heresy; the fate of the dead; skepticism; saints; signs and miracles; good and evil spirits; holidays. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours. ***

HIST 370 - The European Reformations
An examination of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations of the sixteenth century and the conflicts they engendered from the perspectives of: religion, society, politics, culture, and gender. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 371 - Early Modern Culture, Identity, Exchange and Conflict
This course explores the depth and breadth of cultural identities, exchanges and interactions in Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It will examine the role of religion, ethnicity, race and class in shaping early modern identities and informing cultural interactions during this period of violent upheaval and change. ***Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours***

HIST 373 - The European Witch Hunts
Examination of the origins, development, and decline of the witch persecutions in Western Europe from 1400-1700. Students will learn how historians draw on fields such as feminist theory, psychology, sociology, and anthropology in order to understand the complexities of this topic. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 374 - Revolution and Terror in France, 1789-1799
This course considers the origins, course and significance of the French Revolution of 1789-1799. Topics covered include: cultural and political origins; the pre-revolution; the events of 1789; the remaking of France; radicalization; the revolutionary wars; women and revolution; the Counterrevolution; the Terror; the Thermidorian Reaction and the Directory. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 376 - Rising from the Ashes: Germany Since 1945
This course surveys the political, social and cultural history of post-war Germany, paying particular attention to the historiographical debates on the course and character of recent German history and the country's role in post-war Europe. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 378 - The Third Reich
This course will examine the historiographical controversies concerning the social and political history of the Third Reich. Topics to be considered include the origins of National Socialism, Nazi ideology, the Holocaust, and German opposition to Hitler. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 381 - European Military History
A study of European warfare from the Renaissance to the present. Particular attention is focused upon the interaction between war and economic, social, political, technological and cultural developments. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 281. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 381 and HIST 281. *

HIST 382 - Military History: The First World War
Focusing on the military history of the First World War, this course studies war plans, strategy and leadership, technology and tactics, civil-military and inter-allied relations, battles on land and sea, as well as the experience of war. Military events are considered in relation to broader economic, social, political and cultural developments. ***Prerequisite: One History course or completion of 30 credit hours*** *Note: Formerly numbered HIST 282. Students may only receive credit for one of HIST 282, HIST 382 (if taken prior to 201110) or HIST 383*

HIST 383 - Military History: The Second World War
Focusing on the military history of the Second World War, this course studies war plans, strategy and leadership, technology and tactics, civil-military and inter-allied relations, battles on land and sea, as well as the experience of war. Military events are considered in relation to broader economic, social, political and cultural developments. ***Prerequisite: One History course or completion of 30 credit hours*** *Note: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 382 (if taken prior to 201110) or 383*

HIST 390AP - Italy: Napoleon to Mussolini
This course will examine the development of nationalism under Napoleon, in the 1848 Revolutions, in the unification of the nation in 1871, and in the transformation of that nation into a fascist state under Benito Mussolini, in the wake of World War One and the Russian Revolution. *** Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours. ***

HIST 390AQ - Memory & Place in Asia: Sites of Commemoration, Spirituality, and Meaning
This course explores symbolic space in Asia, places with an historic, cultural, religious or political significance. From sacred shrines to places of mourning, natural wonders to fabled cities, these sites convey a variety of meanings, expressing loss and remembrance, quest and healing. Places covered include Nanjing, Hiroshima, Angkor, and Varanasi. PREREQUISITE: One History course or completion of 30 credit hours.

HIST 390AU - Origins of Modern Antisemitism and the Holocaust
The religious and cultural roots of antisemitism and its manifestations in Western civilization: the rise of racist and political antisemitism in Europe; seminal issues in the history of the Holocaust; an analysis of the various political and cultural responses to the events of this period. ***Prerequisites: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of HIST 390AU or RLST 322.*

HIST 390DF - Canadian Politics and Charter Rights
This course will examine the influence of the Charter of Rights on political and social change in Canada. Emphasis will be on civil liberties, group rights and political and soci-economnic conflict, and the evolving roles of party politics, the judiciary, and extra-Parliamentary politics. ***Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours***

HIST 390DH - History of the Mexico-US Border
How has the US-Mexico border region changed over time? What role has violence played? This course explores these questions in the context of the US-Mexico relationship. Topics covered include nation and identity formation, the Mexican-American War, the Mexican Revolution, transnational wealth disparity, migration, NAFTA, and the Trump Presidency. *** Prerequisite: One HIST Course or completion of 30 credit hours ***

HIST 390DI - Eating Canadian? History of Food in Canada
Is there a "Canadian" cuisine? In this course, students will feast upon Canadian food history, from colonization to the present. Questions to uncover include: How did colonization affect Indigenous foodways? What kinds of foods have immigrants brought to Canada? And, what are the connections between food and health? ***Prerequisite: One HIST course of completion of 30 credit hours***

HIST 390DJ - Genocide in the Modern World: A Comparative History
How and why do genocides happen? How are they experienced? The class uses four international case studies from the 19th and 20th centuries, examining the specific history of each genocide—origins, events, aftermath, commemoration—alongside reoccurring factors that create the conditions for all genocides: war, colonialism, racism/xenophobia, extreme political ideologies. ***Prerequisite: One HIST course or completion of 30 credit hours.***

HIST 400 - Theories of History
This is a seminar course examining the variety of approaches to the study of history from 1900 to the present. Movements studied include Marxism, the Annales School, Feminist Theory, and Post-Modernism. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permssion of Department Head ***

HIST 403 - Studies in Canadian Political History
An analysis of how prime ministers of Canada have envisioned the country, devised and implemented policies, and managed political affairs. Based on a comparative approach, the course is a study in power as it was exercised by such leaders as John Diefenbaker, Lester Pearson, Pierre Trudeau, and Brian Mulroney. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permssion of Department Head ***

HIST 406 - Canada and World War l
On home front and battlefront, World War I transformed Canada. Social movements came to a crescendo and national identity was reshaped. The multi-faceted impact of the war is contextualized in the pre- and post-war periods using the analytical categories of ethnicity, class and gender. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permssion of Department Head *** * Note: Formerly numbered HIST 306. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 406 and HIST 306. *

HIST 415 - The Writing of History
The course aims to instil theoretical and methodological understanding of the discipline of history. While potentially of value for many students in liberal arts and pre-professional courses, it is especially relevant for history majors seeking to locate their specific interests in the wider context of the academic discipline. Such a course may well be regarded as a staple in a well-rounded history program. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permssion of Department Head ***

HIST 420 - Doing Women's and Gender History
In this senior level course, students learn how to “do” women’s and gender history. Through discussions about interpreting sources and disseminating historical knowledge, they acquire deep familiarity with women’s and gender historiography. As well, by applying advanced historical methods and sharing their findings, they themselves become practising historians. ***Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or completion of 60 credit hours or permission of Department Head.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of WGST 480AJ or HIST 420.*

HIST 422 - From Wife Sales to Princess Di: Popular Culture since 1700
The course covers Britain and North America; theories of popular culture; traditional popular art forms and rituals, including ballads, rough music and wife-sales; the press and the invention of new forms such as cartoons, comic strips and celebrity culture; the history of shopping and consumption; the fragmentation of popular culture. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permssion of Department Head ***

HIST 432 - Black Power in US History
Examines the roots of black power and considers its historical evolution in the United States throughout the twentieth century. This course demonstrates how black power, commonly thought to be distinct from the mainstream of civil rights activism, has always been a vital part of African American freedom struggles. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300-level or completion of 60 credit hours or permission of Department Head. ***

HIST 434 - American Trials of the Twentieth Century
A consideration of landmark United States court decisions during the twentieth century with emphasis on the changing social context in which trials took place to understand how everyday life and popular ideals affected the law, as well as to appreciate the impact of the courtroom on modern American life. ***Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200 or 300 level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permission of Department Head***

HIST 450 - Modernity in Asia
This seminar introduces students to recent critical theories and explores the meaning of 'modernity' as reflected in the relationship between culture and society in 19th and 20th century Asian history. It does so by associating readings in social theory with academic and literary texts from or about the Asian region. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permssion of Department Head ***

HIST 466 - The Middle Ages in Film
This course critically examines films set in the Middle Ages in order to explore the issue of the value of cinematic representations of medieval history. Topics addressed include race and ethnicity, gender roles, epic heroism, faith, religion, and holiness, and war in films set in the Middle Ages. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permssion of Department Head ***

HIST 472 - From Magic to Science: The Evolution of Early Modern European Thought
Between 1450 and 1700, the mental landscape of Europe changed dramatically. Magic and alchemy flourished in the Renaissance, but were abandoned by the time of the Scientific Revolution. This course will examine the many facets of this evolution and the impact it had on both scholarly and popular culture. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permssion of Department Head ***

HIST 474 - War and Culture in Europe: World War I
This course examines the controversial idea of the Great War as a watershed in European cultural history and the different ways in which class, gender, nationality, politics, and the passage of time have conditioned the experience and memory of the war. Writers', artists', and historians' views are considered. *** Prerequisite: Two HIST courses at the 200- or 300- level or Completion of 60 credit hours or permssion of Department Head ***

HIST 498 - Honours Directed Studies
** Permission of the Department Head is required to register. **

HIST 499 - Honours Directed Studies
** Permission of the Department Head is required to register. **

HIST 800 - Theories of History
This is a seminar course examining the variety of approaches to the study of history from 1900 to the present. Movements studied include Marxism, the Annales School, Feminist Theory, and Post-Modernism.

HIST 801 - Canadian Intellectual History
Studies in the sources, development and impact of ideas that have shaped Canadian society since Confederation. The course examines the lives and works of thinkers who have enlarged and refined our understanding of nationalism, political ideology, social, religion, and more generally, what it must be like to be Canadian.

HIST 803 - Canadian Political History
An analysis of how prime ministers of Canada have envisioned the country, devised and implemented policies, and managed political affairs. Based on a comparative approach, the course is a study in power as it was exercised by such leaders as John Diefenbaker, Lester Pearson, Pierre Trudeau, and Brian Mulroney.

HIST 805 - Contemporary Quebec
An analysis of the puzzling, specific and distinct history of Quebec. By examining issues such as language, religion, economic development and politics with special attention to recent history, this course will delve into Québecois uniqueness and its implications.

HIST 806 - Canada and World War l
On the home-front and battle-front, World War I transformed Canada. Social movements came to a crescendo and national identity was reshaped. The multi-faceted impact of the war is contextualized in the pre- and post-war periods using the analytical categories of ethnicity, class and gender.

HIST 809 - Canadian Nationalism
This course will examine the theoretical framework of nationalism, study the history of nationalism throughout the world, and investigate the manifestations of nationlism in Canada. Some of the topics to be studied include the origins of nationalism, the uses of nationalism, and modern examples of nationalism.

HIST 815 - The Writing of History
A study of the evolution of historical writings in terms of major historians, schools of thought, changing frameworks of analysis and contested interpretations of significant events. The course aims to instil a theoretical and methodological understanding of historiography for graduate students.

HIST 820 - Doing Women's and Gender History
In this graduate course, students learn how to "do" women's and gender history. Emphasis is placed on feminist theories of history, as well as on the role of gender in historiography. In addition, by applying advanced methods and sharing their findings, students in this course become practising historians.

HIST 822 - From Wife Sales to Princess Di: Popular Culture since 1700
The course covers Britain and North America; theories of popular culture; traditional popular art forms and rituals, including ballads, rough music and wife-sales; the press and the invention of new forms such as cartoons, comic strips and celebrity culture; the history of shopping and consumption; the fragmentation of popular culture.

HIST 832 - Black Power in U.S. History
Examines the roots of black power and considers its historical evolution in the United States throughout the twentieth century. This course demonstrates how black power, commonly thought to be distinct from the mainstream of civil rights activism, has always been a vital part of African American freedom struggles.

HIST 834 - American Trials of the Twentieth Century
A consideration of landmark United States court decisions during the twentieth century with emphasis on the changing social context in which trials took place to understand how everyday life and popular ideals affected the law, as well as to appreciate the impact of the courtroom on modern American life.

HIST 835 - Frontier Hollywood, Myth, & US
This course explores the dynamic relationship between American film and the mythical American frontier. Myth and its cultural significance, Frederick Jackson Turner's Frontier Thesis, the history of American cinema, the role of myth in film, the genesis of the Western, and the nature of Manifest Destiny, will be examined.

HIST 850 - Modernity in Asia
This seminar introduces students to recent critical theories and explores the meaning of 'modernity' as reflected in the relationship between culture and society in 19th and 20th century Asian history. It does so by associating readings in social theory with academic and literary texts from or about the Asian region. ** Permission of the Department Head is required to register. **

HIST 860 - Ancient History: Theory and Practice
The main focus is on the use of archaeology in the study of ancient history. Topics addressed include: domestication; human remains; the environment; beliefs; the spread of cultures; the ownership of antiquities; the use of technologies.

HIST 864 - Roman Social History
Themes in the history of Roman society and social institutions. Topics include methodology, childhood and family structure, health and diet, living conditions, recreation, and social attitudes.

HIST 866 - The Middle Ages in Film
This course critically examines films set in the Middle Ages in order to explore the issue of the value of cinematic representations of medieval history. Topics addressed include race and ethnicity, gender roles, epic heroism, faith, religion, and holiness, and war in films set in the Middle Ages.

HIST 867 - Medieval Marriage & Family
This course investigates the history of marriage and the family in medieval Europe. It covers such topics as: the development of Christian attitudes towards marriage; marriage practices; family structures and strategies; children and childhood.

HIST 872 - From Magic to Science: The Evolution of Early Modern European Thought
Between 1450 and 1700, the mental landscape of Europe changed dramatically. Magic and alchemy flourished in the Renaissance, but were abandoned by the time of the Scientific Revolution. This course will examine the many facets of this evolution and the impact it had on both scholarly and popular culture.

HIST 874 - War and Culture in Europe WWI
This course examines the controversial idea of the Great War as a watershed in European cultural history and the different ways in which class, gender, nationality, politics and the passage of time have conditioned the experience and memory of the War. Writers', artists', and historians' views are considered.

HIST 878 - The Berlin Seminar
This course focuses on aspects of Berlin's history during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Themes include the effects of industrialization, the transformation of urban life during the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the division of the city after World War II, and changes following the collapse of the wall.

HIST 890AI - Nazi Movement in Germany
This course will take a critical look at the work of recent historians of the Third Reich. It will pay particular attention to the role interpretations of the Third Reich play in larger discussions of German History.

HIST 890AL - Sask and Canadian Federalism
This course examines the Canadian feralism from the perspective of Saskatchewan's postwar role in shaping national policy. The province's impact on the federation is analyzed through a series of topics in which one of the instructors has been an active participant through most of his political life. ** Permission of the Department Head is required to register. **

HIST 890AM - Gender, Body & Spirit Med Euro
This course will examine the theme of "the body" in late medieval Christianity, through a study of the writings and ideas of selected theologians, saints and mystics.

HIST 890AN - Military Effectiveness: The First and Second World Wars
This course considers the factors which conditioned military effectiveness on the battlefield during the First and Second World Wars. Its particular focus is on the British, French, German, Russian, American and Canadian armed forces.

HIST 890AO - Theory and Practice of Social Welfare in Canada, 1867-1939
The course examines social welfare in Canada from 1867 to 1939. In particular, it analyses poor relief systems from a variety of theoretical perspectives: the inter-relationship between the private and public sectors; professionalization and bureaucratization of social work; and the role of gender, race and class in policy formation.

HIST 890AP - British Literature and History
This course explores the extent to which the literature of the period reflected social and cultural conditions as well as attitudes that can be useful to the historian. It places side by side contemporary works of fiction together with the works of historians and focuses on the intersections between them.

HIST 890AQ - Medieval Revival Styles in European and North American Architecture, 19th and 20th Centuries
This course will explore the development of the medieval revival in architecture in Europe (including Britain) and North America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Both Gothic and Romanesque styles of architecture will be covered, as will the social and cultural contexts of the medieval revival.

HIST 890AR - The British State and Radicalism, 1700-2000
This course examines how the British state responded to and changed as a result of the pressure put on it by radical movements and groups. We look at the parliamentary reform movement, Painites and revolutionaries in the 1790s, Owenism, socialism, radical trade unionism and the British Communist Party.

HIST 890AS - Magic and Superstition in England and Colonial America, 1500-1750
This course is a comparative study of popular belief in early modern England and New England. The focus will be on the transmission of beliefs from the Old to the New World, and the social expression of those beliefs in witch trials and witchcraft panics.

HIST 890AT - Canadian-American Perspectives
A historical analysis of the Canadian-American relationship focusing in depth on the controversial as well as problematic inter-connection of Canada and the United States. Paying important attention to the distinct political, economic, cultural and social evolution of these two countries, this course delves their differences and similarities in historical terms.

HIST 890AU - Writing Early Modern History: Theories and Approaches
This course is an examination of recent historiographical theories and approaches, with particular reference to their application in the research and writing of early modern European history.

HIST 890AV - Media Agenda-Setting and Its History
This course examines literature that explores how and why audiences are influenced by mass media. This includes a consideration of agenda setting theory, the phenomena of framing and priming, as well as an introduction to the history of print journalism in Canada.

HIST 890AW - Canadian Federalism in Comparative Perspective
Examines the development and workings of Canadian Federalism by comparing it with other federations. Explores the relation between the two levels of government over a variety of issues (division of powers and fiscal arrangements). How Canada's lingualistic and ethnic diversity has been major determinants of a particularly brand of federalism.

HIST 890AX - Social History in Nineteenth-Century Britain
Examines the Industrial Revolution and its consequences, rural unemployment and poverty, the New Poor Law of 1834, labour disputes and early trade unionism, efforts to reorganize and reform urban space and hygiene, the role of religion in the lives of ordinary people, the beginnings of the women¿s movement.

HIST 890AY - Martin Luther: His Life, Thought and Infuence
Martin Luther (1483-1546) continues to attract the attention of early modern historians. This course will examine recent approaches to and interpretations of Luther and his role in the Reformation. Particular emphasis will be placed on the interplay between his theology and the political context in which he lived and worked.

HIST 890AZ - Hitler in History: An Historiographical Investigation
More than six decades after Hitler¿s death, academic and popular interest in him is unabated. In this seminar course, students will analyze various interpretations of Hitler and his historical significance offered by various historians. It will also look at the portrayal of Hitler in books, films, television programs and documentaries.

HIST 890BA - Housing and Society in Roman Britain
This course examines the use of housing, by Romans and Romanized Britons, to represent and communicate ideas about social status. It is based primarily on archaeological evidence from Roman Britain, informed by literary and archaeological evidence from elsewhere in the Empire.

HIST 890BC - Topics in Jesuit History
This reading course examines Jesuit history with a particular emphasis on Jesuit education, spirituality and intellectual ministry. It will consider Jesuit formation as well as the short-and long-term impact of Jesuit educational work since the establishment of the first Jesuit schools in the mid 1500s. The link between Ignatian spirituality and Jesuit pedagogy will be a major theme throughout the course.

HIST 890BD - Historiography and the Writing of History
This reading course will involve an examination of theories of history and developments in writing history from the early twentieth century to the present.

HIST 890BE - The History of Military Thought
An examination of military thought from the Renaissance to the 21st Century. Ideas on the use of military force are placed in social, political and cultural context. Particular case studies will be considered to explore the relationship between the theories and practices of modern warfare.

HIST 890BF - Crises and the Expanding American Presidency
The course will explore how a variety of crises have engendered an expansion of presidential authority in the United States since the founding of the republic.

HIST 890BG - Homeland Insecurity: The US and Domestic Security from Reconstruction to the War on Terror
This course examines the United States and its responses to issues of domestic security. Starting with the end of Reconstruction, major areas of examination will include both domestic American terrorism and international secruity risks.

HIST 890BH - The Emergence of the Zapatistas in Historical Context
The course explores the emergence of Mexico's Zapatista movement in the historical context of Latin American revolutions and resistance movements. In rough chronological order it explores revolutions in Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia, Cuba, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Peru.

HIST 890BI - The Architecture of Imperialism in Latin America
The course examines the structures of imperialism in Latin American history, in particular a consideration of ideologies and behaviour. It considers how the various imperial projects manifested themselves in material culture, language, religion, gender, and governance.

HIST 890BJ - Indigenous Response to Postcolonial Western Canada
This course examines the responses of Indigenous peoples to their circumstances in postcolonial western Canada. Emphasis is placed on identifying relevant postcolonial theory and on the formation of organizations to further goals identified by Indigenous peoples during the latter half of the 20th century.

HIST 890BP - Literature and History in Britain, 1700-1850
This course explores the extent to which the literature of the period reflected social and cultural conditions as well as attitudes that can be useful to the historian. It places side by side contemporary works of fiction together with the works of historians and focuses on the intersections between them.

HIST 890BR - The Chinese Immigrant Experience
This advanced directed reading course will explore themes within the history of the Chinese immigrant experience. Specific topics include immigration policy, public attitudes, economic factors and considerations of family, gender and race. While the focus is on western Canada, relevant examples from the global context will also be examined.

HIST 890BS - History of the Jesuits
The course explores the history of the Jesuits, examining their impact on political, religious, sociological and intellectual life worldwide.

HIST 890BT - Gender and US Politics
This course analyzes how ideas about gender shape US politics. We will consider men's and women's participation in both electoral politics and reform activism in an effort to understand how notions of masculinity and femininity shape ideologies that become attached to policy decisions and partisan politics.

HIST 890BU - Treaties and Treaty-Making in Canada
This course will survey the treaties between First Peoples and the Crown in Canada, and the process through which those treaties were negotiated, including colonial treaties, such as the Douglas Treaties, and the Haldimand Proclamation; the numbered treaties negotiated between 1871 and 1930; and contemporary treaty-making.

HIST 900 - Research Methods in History
This course is intended to teach the research methods, writing, and critical and analytical skills necessary for successful research at the M.A. level in History. This is a compulsory two semester course.

HIST 901 - Research
Thesis research.