Indigenous Scholars

Angela Snowshoe

Angela Snowshoe

Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology
Faculty of Education

Dr. Angela Snowshoe is an Assistant Professor in Educational Psychology at the University of Regina and a member of Métis Nation of Ontario. She completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Western Ontario in 2015. Angela has an ideal balance of clinical and research experiences with youth and adults from diverse and under-serviced populations. Her strong orientation to social justice issues and decolonizing agendas is evident in her work as a professor, clinician, and researcher. Her research interests include the role of cultural connectedness in promoting mental wellness among First Nations youth, their families, and their communities. Angela is particularly keen in blending quantitative and Indigenous methodologies to increase the relevance of her research for First Nations communities. She is recognized by her colleagues for her practical guidance on conducting strengths-based research and decolonized therapy with First Nations peoples.

Website: http://www.uregina.ca/education/faculty-staff/faculty/snowshoe-angela.html

Carmen Robertson

Carmen Robertson

Professor of Art History, Department of Visual Arts
Faculty of Media, Art, and Performance

Carmen Robertson’s research explores Indigenous identities and colonial issues through art histories, visual culture, and media analysis. A SSHRC-supported scholar, her latest book, Mythologizing Norval Morrisseau: Art and the Colonial Narrative (UMP, 2016), interrogates imposed identities and resistant performativity. Norval Morrisseau: Art and Life (ACI, 2016), an e-book in a series on Canadian Art Histories, inserts Morrisseau into a larger art narrative. Her co-written monograph, Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers (2011), won three book awards. As well as essays in edited collections, she publishes in such scholarly journals as the Review of Canadian Art, the Journal of Canadian Art History, Media History, the American Indian Quarterly, and the Australian Journal of Indigenous Education. Robertson teaches courses in Indigenous and contemporary art histories as well as curatorial studies in the department of Visual Arts. She designed MAP 202 Indigenous Issues in the Arts and regularly teaches contemporary Indigenous art history courses. Robertson also teaches Exhibiting Art on Location, an experiential course related to display and collection of Andean art histories on site in Peru. Robertson holds a PhD from University of Calgary in Educational Research and has been teaching at University of Regina since 2007. Before that she taught at First Nations University of Canada. Born and raised in and around the Qu’Appelle Valley in Saskatchewan, Robertson’s Indigenous ancestry is Lakota and Métis.

Website: http://www.uregina.ca/mediaartperformance/faculty-staff/faculty/f-robertson-carmen.html

David Garneau

David Garneau(Métis)

Associate Professor of Visual Arts
Faculty of Media, Art, and Performance

David Garneau was born and raised in Edmonton, received a BFA in Painting and Drawing, and an MA in American Literature from the University of Calgary.

Garneau’s practice includes painting, drawing, performance art, video, curation and critical writing. He is interested in visual and tactile expressions of contemporary Indigenous identities and moments of productive friction between nature and culture, materialism and metaphysics.

His art appears in the collections of The Canadian History Museum; the Canadian Parliament buildings; Indian and Inuit Art Collection; the NONAM museum, Zurich; the Musée de la civilization, Montreal; and numerous other public and private collections. He has curated numerous large and small exhibitions: The End of the World (as we know it); Picture Windows: New Ab-straction; Transcendent Squares; Contested Histories; Making it Like a Man!, Graphic Visions, TEXTiles. He recently co-curated (with Michelle LaVallee) Moving Forward, Never Forgetting, an exhibition concerning the legacies of Indian Residential Schools, other forms of aggressive assimilation, and (re)conciliation.

Garneau has written numerous catalogue essays and reviews and was a co-founder and co-editor of Artichoke and Cameo magazines. He has recently given talks in Australia, the United States, and Canada. He is currently working on curatorial projects in Sydney and New York, and is part of a five-year, SSHRC-funded, curatorial research project, “Creative Conciliation.”

Website: http://www.uregina.ca/mediaartperformance/faculty-staff/faculty/f-garneau-david.html

JoLee Sasakamoose

JoLee Sasakamoose

Assistant Professor in Educational Psychology
Faculty of Education

Dr. JoLee Sasakamoose is an Anishinabe (Ojibwe) from M’Chigeeng First Nation in Ontario. Dr. Sasakamoose is an Indigenous methodologist utilizing community and participatory-based health research approaches with FN and Metis individuals, families and communities. She is a Research Associate with the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre (IPHRC) and a methodologist with the Saskatchewan Centre for Patient Oriented Research (SCPOR) a Canadian Institute of Health Research initiative (CIHR).  

From a strengths-based, trauma informed decolonizing lens, her research engages Indigenous peoples in defining health and healthy communities; explores traditional cultural healing methods as protective factors against the intergenerational effects of historical trauma and utilizes evidence-based neurodecolonizing, contemplative, mind-body practices in the promotion of health and well-being.  

Dr. Sasakamoose is the founder of Sîtoskâkewin© Indigenous expressive therapies. Sîtoskâkewin utilizes an Indigenous wellness framework to implement expressive arts in the promotion of mental, physical, emotional and spiritual well-being for all people. Dr. Sasakamoose is the founding director of the Health Advocacy and Research Training (HART) Program.  

Dr. Sasakamoose has received funding from the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation, the Community Initiatives Fund, the Saskatchewan Instructional Development and Research Unit (SIDRU) and CIHR. She teaches Group Counselling, Counselling Girls and Women, Counselling Children and Youth, Aboriginal Family Therapies, and Indigenous Qualitative Research Methodologies, and has expertise in the area of addictions and treatment.

Website: http://www.uregina.ca/education/faculty-staff/faculty/sasakamoose-jolee.html

Randy Lundy

Randy Lundy

Assistant Professor of English (Term)
Campion College

Randy Lundy is a member of the Barren Lands (Cree) First Nation, Brochet, MB. Born in Thompson, Northern Manitoba, he has lived most of his life in Saskatchewan. He grew up near Hudson Bay, SK, just a stone’s throw from the confluence of the Fir, Etamomi, and Red Deer Rivers

He completed a BA (Hons.) and an MA in English at the University of Saskatchewan, where he studied religion, philosophy, and Indigenous literatures, completing a thesis on the plays of Tomson Highway. He has published two books of poetry, Under the Night Sun and Gift of the Hawk. 2016 will see the publication of a third book of poems, Blackbird Song. His poetry has been widely anthologized, including in the seminal texts Native Poetry in Canada: A Contemporary Anthology and An Anthology of Canadian Native Literature in English. His poetry has appeared in anthologies in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia. He has also published scholarly articles on writing and on the work of Tomson Highway and Daniel David Moses. Randy writes short stories and is currently working on a manuscript, Certainties, for publication. Randy teaches Indigenous literatures and creative writing in the English Department at Campion College, University of Regina.

Website: http://campioncollege.ca/contact-us/faculty-listing/prof-randy-lundy

Shauneen Pete

Shauneen Pete

Associate Professor, Educational Administration and Educational Core Studies
Faculty of Education

Tansi, I am from Little Pine First Nations, Saskatchewan. I have been an educator in the province for over twenty-five years. I have worked as an alternative high school teacher; a division level educational consultant and professor. I served as both the Vice-President (Academic) and Interim President at First Nations University of Canada (FNUniv).

I am a professional storyteller. I share contemporary and traditional stories in schools, community groups and here at the university. As a public speaker, I present on topics of workplace equity; institutional racism; cultural competency development; leadership and organizational change. I speak to issues concerning First Nations people’s histories, identities and issues including women and leadership; violence against women; First Nations education and more recently on issues associated with Indigenizing the University.

I am committed to enhancing the educational opportunities of First Nations and Métis students in our province.

I teach Education Core Studies (ECS) classes at the undergraduate level. My aim is to create courses which effectively prepare educators for the complexity of student and community diversities. As an Indigenous educator I ensure that the voices of First Nations and Métis scholars, traditional knowledge keepers, educators and students are central to my teaching. I have learned that for the most part, few students feel adequately prepared to address current student diversity.

Together, students and I explore the theory and practice of social justice, anti-oppressive and Indigenous education. Case studies draw our attention to common social concerns like racism, poverty and other issues. Culturally responsive teaching methods provide students with one approach to preparing for student diversity.

I believe that by structuring our courses for "problem-posing" (Freire, 1974) we can inspire the learner to become engaged in the process of redefining educational practice and schooling - transforming our collective work along the way. I view my role as "facilitator" supporting learners to discover for themselves some ways in which to play an active role in social justice education. Freire states "through dialogue...the teacher is no longer merely the one-who-teaches, but one who is him(her)self taught in dialogue with students, who in turn while being taught also teach" (p. 67). Freire continues, "The teacher presents the material to the students for their consideration, and re-considers his(her) earlier considerations as the students express their own" (p. 68). It is my intention to create the conditions for dialogue and mutual growth. (Pedagogy of the Oppressed, 1974).

Website: http://www.uregina.ca/education/faculty-staff/faculty/pete-shauneen.html

Harpell Montgomery (Monty)

Harpell Montgomery (Monty), BSW, MSW, PhD (Educational Administration)

Associate Professor
Faculty of Social Work (Saskatoon campus)

Monty Montgomery has been working in the field of First Nations child and family services since the 1990s, both within Government and for First Nations organizations as a practitioner, policy analyst, program developer, administrator and researcher. He is an active member of the First Nations Research Advisory Committee that oversees the First Nations component of the Canadian Incidence Studies of Reported and Neglect, and he is a collaborator on numerous research grants exploring the overrepresentation of Aboriginal children in care across Canada. He has worked extensively with First Nations in British Columbia and Saskatchewan to build their administrative, research and human resource capacities to integrate traditional ways and Indigenous Knowledges within professional child welfare programs and practice.

Website: http://www.uregina.ca/socialwork/faculty-staff/faculty/Montgomery-M-bio.html

Raven Sinclair

Raven Sinclair

Associate Professor
Faculty of Social Work (Saskatoon campus)

Raven Sinclair is a member of George Gordon First Na-tion (Nehiyaw-Cree) of the Treaty #4 area of southern Saskatchewan, Canada. She has one daughter who is 11 years old and keeps her on her toes.

Raven is an Associate Professor of Social Work with the University of Regina, Saskatoon Campus. Her areas of interest include Indigenous mental health and trauma recovery, research and ethics, Indigenous child welfare and youth suicide, transracial adoption and cultural identity, interpersonal and non-violent communication, lateral violence intervention, group process and facilitation, and critical race theory.

Website: http://www.uregina.ca/socialwork/faculty-staff/faculty/Sinclair-R-bio.html