Catalog Descriptions

ENGL 100 - Critical Reading and Writing I
This course develops students' proficiency in critical reading and writing through the study of a wide range of non-literary and literary texts, and the study of composition, with emphasis on connections between modes of reading and writing. *Note: Students who are planning to repeat ENGL 100 should seek academic advising before doing so*

ENGL 110 - Critical Reading and Writing II
A study of a special topic in literature, which may include non-literary texts, in conjunction with a continuation of the writing program begun in ENGL 100. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100.*** *Note: Every section of ENGL 110 has a different focus. Please consult the Department's Supplementary Calendar or the list of current course offerings on the Departmental website.* *Note: Students who fail ENGL 110 twice should contact their faculty or their federated college immediately.*

ENGL 152 - Introduction to Creative Writing
This creative writing course will focus on grammar and syntax basics for writers, and on the skill of reading literature as someone engaged in the craft. Through the workshop process, the course will help students develop their skills in writing for an audience and editing their work. It may be offered online or face-to-face. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100, or permission of the Department Head.***

ENGL 211 - Literature Survey I
A survey of literature in English from the Middle Ages to 1800. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 24 credit hours.***

ENGL 212 - Literature Survey II
A survey of literature in English from 1800 to the present. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 24 credit hours.***

ENGL 213 - Survey of Canadian Literature
A survey of Canadian Literature in English from the pre-twentieth century to the present day. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 24 credit hours.***

ENGL 214 - Survey of Indigenous Canadian Literature
This survey provides students with knowledge of the terms and issues central to an engaged study of Indigenous Canadian literature. Indigenous storytelling traditions are linked with developments in writing in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, focusing on divergences and continuities in the writing. Drama, fiction, and poetry will be considered. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and 9 credit hours.***

ENGL 221 - Poetry
Practice in the analysis of poetry. Through the study of a wide range of poetic genres, this course provides students with a shared vocabulary of literary terms for the critical discussion of formal, stylistic and historical aspects of individual texts and of poetic traditions. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 24 credit hours.***

ENGL 222 - Fiction
Practice in the analysis of fiction. Through the study of a wide range of fictional genres, such as the short story, the novella and the novel, this course provides students with methods and vocabulary for the formal, stylistic, cultural and historical study of both individual texts and traditions of fiction. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 24 credit hours.***

ENGL 223 - Drama
Practice in the analysis of drama. Through the study of dramatic traditions and selected plays (considered both as written texts and as performance), this course provides students with methods and a shared critical vocabulary, to enhance their understanding, enjoyment, and critique of drama as a ritualized mode of cultural experience. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 24 credit hours.***

ENGL 251 - Expository and Persuasive Writing
The theory and practice of expository and persuasive writing. Each student will be expected to write several papers in a variety of modes of writing. *** Prerequisite: A combined average of at least 60% in any two English courses numbered 100 or higher, and completion of at least 30 credit hours. ***

ENGL 252 - Creative Writing I
The craft of creative writing, with work in poetry, drama or non-fiction, and prose fiction. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or ENGL 152.***

ENGL 271 - Health Studies and Literature
This course focuses on how knowledge of creativity, and understanding through reading and experiencing literature and culture, can be understood in the context of health studies. Students will learn to better understand how individuals experience, negotiate, and process illness, trauma, loss, dying, aging and suffering. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100***

ENGL 275 - Literature and Popular Culture
This course focuses on popular culture as manifested in a variety of forms, including mass and social media, music, film, graphic novels, etc. The course aims at exploring the connections between popular culture and literature, and the ways in which popular culture can be analyzed using the tools of literary analysis. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100.***

ENGL 276 - Literature and Interdisciplinary Contexts
This course engages students in the study of literature in the context of various disciplines (justice, health, psychology, disability studies, science, environmentalism, urban studies, law, etc.). The focus of individual offerings of the course will be determined by the individual instructor in consultation with the Department Head of English. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100.***

ENGL 300 - Chaucer
A study of some of the major works of Chaucer, including selections from "The Canterbury Tales". ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours***

ENGL 301 - Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances
A study of five to seven of Shakespeare's comedies and romances. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 302 - Shakespeare: Histories and Tragedies
A study of five to seven of Shakespeare's histories and tragedies. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 303 - Milton
A study of some of Milton's major works, including "Paradise Lost". ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 304AA - Jane Austen
The novels of Jane Austen. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 304AC - The Poetry of W.B. Yeats
A study of the poetry of W. B. Yeats. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 304AH - James Joyce
Irish writer James Joyce was, arguably, the single most influential English-language author of the twentieth century. This course will undertake an intensive study of two of his novels, Portrait of the Artis as a Young Man (1915) and Ulysses (1922). ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 304AI - William Blake
This course will combine detailed study of selected poetry and prose of William Blake with a study of various critical approaches to that work. It will look at Blake in the context of poststructuralism, contemporary textual theory, and new historicism. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 304AL - Selected Author: J.K.Rowling
This course treats the Harry Potter series by British author J.K. Rowling from a variety of perspectives. We address significant influences on Rowling's writing, ethical questions raised by the books, the Christian treatment of duty and sacrifice, and the history of the books in the world. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 304AO - George R.R. Martin
This course will examine George R. R. Martin's unfinished series, A Song of Ice and Fire, adapted for television as Game of Thrones, from a variety of perspectives, including fantasy, adaptation, political philosophy, gender and body theory, and historical contexts. Students are advised to begin reading Martin's series in advance. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 304AP - Comedies of Menace: Pinter
A study of the plays of Harold Pinter. We will study works spanning the career of Nobel Laureate playwright Harold Pinter, master of comedic menace and of the infamous "Pinter Pause." ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 304AP, THST 381AA, or THST 382.*

ENGL 310AA - Contemporary Indigenous Fiction in Canada
Selected novels and short stories written in English and published by Canadian Indigenous writers after 1973. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 310AB - American 1st Nation Fiction
Fiction by prominent contemporary Indigenous authors. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 310AC - Literatures of Residential Schools in Canada
For over 100 years, residential schools were the cornerstone of the Canadian government's policy of assimilation. The last school closed in 1996. Residential schools have had a profound effect on Indigenous people who attended them and continue to affect Indigenous people today. This class will study works of Indigenous literature that use narrative, poetry, and to drama to expose the effects of the school in an effort to heal from them. We will also look briefly at film and visual art. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 310AE - Indigenous Drama in Canada
This course will examine works by prominent Indigenous playwrights in Canada. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 310AG - Indigenous Literatures in Canada
This course is a survey of contemporary Indigenous Literatures in Canada written in English. The survey will begin with so-called protest or resistance writing from the 1960's and 1970's and examine developments since then, focusing on both divergences and continuities in the writing. Drama, fiction and poetry will be considered. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 310AH - Indigenous Film in Canada
This course examines a range of contemporary films in Canada made by, directed, and starring First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. Through documentaries and feature films, the course considers the aesthetics and representational practices of films that seek to story Indigenous lives and experiences of colonial and neo-colonial Canada. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 310AL - Indigenous Feminism and Women's Writings
During this seminar class, students will engage in critical discussions involving justice and power for/by Indigenous women, gendered violence, Indigenous feminism, intergenerational trauma, women’s residential school narratives and literary writings as restorative justice. Through lectures, readings, and screenings, students will develop critical and interdisciplinary tools for analyzing Indigenous literary discourses. ***Prerequisite of ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or the completion of 48 credit hours***

ENGL 312AA - Auto/biography in Contemporary Canadian Fiction
This course examines contemporary Canadian fiction with emphasis on texts that cross boundaries between auto/biography and fiction for diverse political and narrative effects. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 313AF - Western Canadian Literature
The course explores the literature of Western Canada, from Manitoba to British Columbia. The focus is on post-1950 developments in fiction and poetry, with emphasis on key trends and themes. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 314AA - Canadian Drama
This course examines Canadian plays from the 1960s to the present with a focus on the diversity of theatrical styles and themes, in works from across the country. The course also looks at Canadian Theatre History in relation to Canadian drama and Canadian literature. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 314AA or THEA 380.*

ENGL 314AC - Fixed Form Canadian Poetry
This course examines the choice of poets in general and Canadian poets in particular to write within and against the strictures of established poetic forms (such as the ballad, the sonnet, the pantoum, the sestina, the villanelle and so forth). ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 315AC - Special Topics in Canadian Literature of CanLit and the Politics of Sexuality - an AA-ZZ series
Studies of selected texts from Canadian literature, with attention given to politics of sexuality. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 315AD - Contemporary Canadian Literature and Memory
One characteristic of recent Canadian fiction and poetry is its focus on the past. This class will look at fiction and poetry that considers the personal and historical past in order to query this trend, in order to understand what relationship we have with the past and in order to comprehend what drives people to remember and how those memories function in their current lives. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 315AE - Borders: Canadian Cultural Studies
This class will explore the concept of culture as social identity in literature, and since as Northrop Frye has argued, “Canada must preserve its identity by having many identities,” we will study writers who exemplify the problem of culture in Quebec, First Nations, and English Canada. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 317AB - Contemporary American Literature
This course examines a number of recent American fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction to ascertain the nature of contemporary American experience. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 318AA - American Lit: The Gilded Age
American literature from the end of the Civil War to the end of the 19th Century. Authors may include Twain, James, Jewett, Chopin, Gilman, and Wharton. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 318AB - American Renaissance
This course studies the period when American literature comes of age: the 1850s and after. The major authors are Hawthorne and Melville (his magnificent Moby-Dick is on the reading list); we also consider works by others, including Poe, Emerson and Thoreau. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 318AD - Sexual Politics in American Women's Literature
Nineteenth-century America was a period of transition in marriage, family life, and sex roles - a period striklingly similar to our own. By exploring the representation of gender in the fiction of Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Fanny Fern, Chopin, and Glaspell, we will explore the sexual politics in such a society. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 318AE - American Gothic Fiction
This class surveys the significant Gothic tradition in American literature. Beginning with early masters of horror, Charles Brockden Brown and Edgar Allan Poe, to Henry James and Charlotte Perkins Gilman to, Stephen King and Cormac McCarthy, we will study the supernatural and science, faith and doubt, gender, sex, and desire. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 318AF - Politics of Marriage in 19C American Women’s Literature
In this course, we will explore literary and cultural questions about the role and status of women within the institution of marriage as represented in works by Sarah Grimke, Margaret Fuller, Fanny Fern, Louisa May Alcott, Emily Dickinson, Kate Chopin, and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Secondary readings of mid-19th-century family life, female sexuality and sex roles, as well as the women’s suffrage movement will be included. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 318AG - American Romanticism: The Emergence of American Letters
n this course, we explore the influence of the Romantic movement in Europe on the major American writers in the period from 1840 to 1865 also known as the American Renaissance. We will focus on their ideas about the Self, Nature; and the Sublime. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 318AH - American Protest Literature
This course considers the tradition of American protest literature from The Declaration of Independence through to twenty-first century, new media protest. Protest will be considered in historical and philosophical context, and attention will be given to the centrality of media and communications strategies to movement-building. ***Prerequisite of ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or the completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 318AH or HIST 390DK.*

ENGL 319AA - Women & Lit-Early Modn England
Cultural paradigms of Renaissance women. A study of women as writers, readers, and subjects of literature in the seventeenth century. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 319AD - Women's Detective Fiction
The study of detective fiction written by women. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 319AF - Modern Brit Women Playwrights
Will focus on important British plays written by women in the last twenty years, examining their response to concerns of unique to women and to larger societal issues. Will address the goals and distinctiveness of women's writing and discuss the role of the woman playwright in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 319AG - Eighteenth-Century Women Writers
The eighteenth century saw the rise of the professional woman writer and the emergence of increasing freedoms for women. This course takes up these issues by examining a selection of texts by and about women. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 319AH - Other Worlds: 18th Century Women Writers and Exploration
This class features readings from 18th century women who were engaged in various forms of scientific, geographical, and cultural exploration. We'll read pieces of early science fiction, letters from abroad, and explore the many worlds that made up 18th century London. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 319AH or WGST 380AT.*

ENGL 320AA - Madness and Monstrosity
This course examines both fictional and non-fictional representations of madness and monstrosity in 18th and 19th century women's writing. Course topics include female criminals, prostitutes, monstrous mothers, and those who practice transgressive sexuality. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 322AB - Post Colonial Fiction
The course examines the ways in which writers from the (former) colonies of European empires have responded to colonial domination and exploitation. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 322AF - Global Fantasy Literature
A study of world fantasy literature, with an emphasis on the intersection of genre with histories of colonization and diaspora. Texts are primarily drawn from, or rooted in, cultures outside the North American and European tradition, and may include works in translation. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 325AA - Medieval Literature
This course introduces students to Old and Middle English literature from historical and generic points of view. From the Old English period, we study the epic Beowulf and shorter works. From the Middle English period, we study a fabliau, a beast fable, a parable, dramatic works, and lyrics. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 325AB - Women's Literature of the Middle Ages
This course analyzes writing by and for women in medieval Europe, including the work of Marie de France, Christine de Pisan, Anglo-Saxon and Neo-Latin poetry, and writing on women's health. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 325AC - Cultures of Camelot: The Arthurian Tradition
This course will explore the development of the medieval Arthurian tradition, including the Knights of the Round Table, the mythical court of Camelot, and the figure of Merlin. Students will read a variety of material from all over the world, and examine visual adaptations of the Arthurian romance as well. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 325AD - King Arthur and Medieval Myth
This course examines the origins of fantasy literature in the legends of King Arthur, including characters such as Merlin and Morgan le Fay, and global Arthurian texts. How do we get from King Arthur to Game of Thrones? We'll read works by Marie de France, Malory, Chaucer, and contemporary authors ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 327AB - Middle Ages and 16th C Italian Theatre
Studies in the history and literature of the European theatre in the Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 327AD - Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
This seminar course will examine the late fourteenth-century author of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. We will begin with excerpts from his poem Cleanness, and then move onto Gawain, whose manuscript source (Cotton Nero A.x, British Library) will be examined digitally. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 328AA - Poetics of Faith: Renaissance
This course studies Renaissance poetry and prose texts that exemplify the confrontation between literature and questions of faith and religion. Authors include Spenser, Sidney, Queen Elizabeth, and Thomas Nashe. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 328AC - Romancing RenaissanceNarrative
This course focuses on sixteenth-century prose fiction and the various genres ranging from satire to romance. We study issues raised by the texts, such as the nature-nurture controversy and the virtues of the active and contemporary life, using various modern historic methods which analyse the relationship between politics and poetics. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 328AD - Cannibals & the Renaissance
Beginning with analysis of the colonial history of the word "cannibal" which entered the English language as a result of Columbus's voyages, we explore the ideological functions served by literary and visual depictions of cannibalism and examine debates about the medicinal and nutritional value of human flesh. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 329AA - Tudor & Stuart Theatre
A study of the theatre of Tudor and Stuart England with special reference to the development of specialized space for performance. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 329AB - Censorship and Renaissance Literature
An examination of censorship of poetry, plays, and the pulpit for the period 1600-1642. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 329AC - Early Modern Horror
This course explores early modern dramatic literature that aims to horrify audiences through spectacles of violence, evocations of the supernatural, or treatment of social taboos. We will consider the plays in the context of visual artwork, popular culture, and social practices like public executions. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 331AB - Eighteenth-Century Literature of the Fringe
The focus of this course is twofold: we will explore literature written about madmen, fallen women, orphans, servants, and other marginal figures, and we will study works by writers who lived and wrote on the fringe of society. In so doing, the course interrogates the widespread notion that the Restoration and Eighteenth Century was an age of reason, order, and decorum. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 331AC - 18th C. Sexualities
This course will investigate the treatment of gender and sexuality during the long eighteenth century. Students will read short fiction, novels, poetry, and critical materials which pertain to the development of sexuality during the period, and we will also discuss artwork and pamphlet literature. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 331AD - Sexual/Textual Transgression in the Eighteenth Century
Samuel Johnson defines the creative power of wit as an “unexpected copulation of ideas.” We will study Early Modern writings such as the Earl of Rochester’s poetry, Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, and Sterne’s Tristram Shandy as it pursues the unexpected transgressions of sexual mores as a metaphor for the unexplored regions of human experience. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 331AE - The 18th Century Novel: Truth Structured like a Fiction
This course will study the rise of realism in the novel and its relationship to the rise of the middle class by focusing on the question of historical truth—in fiction—and the secularization of ethics. Is fiction needed to produce a truth otherwise unavailable in “reality”? ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 331AF - Representations of London in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature
Working within critical theories about place and space, this course traces London’s representation in poetry, fiction, and drama from the massive destruction of the Great Fire in 1666 through the city’s growth into a metropolis alternatively celebrated for its size and diversity and feared for its mysteries. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 335AA - Wild Romanticism: Transatlantic & Ecocritical Approaches to British Romanticism
This course explores what it means to be “wild” in a variety of 18th and 19th-century contexts, including aesthetic (the sublime, the gothic); moral and ethical (Anglo-American depictions of Indigenous peoples); and ecological (nature as alternatively threatened or threatening). ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 336AC - Victorian Poetry
A selection of Victorian poetry. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 336AE - Lyric Romanticism
A study of British Romantic lyric poetry. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 336AG - 19C Lit: Inventing England
Nineteenth-century Britain, shaken by revolutionary changes, sought to reinvent itself. This course asks how 19th century "England" imagined itself, in historical fiction, romance, adventure fiction, and sentimental realism, forms which permit both nostalgia for a re-imagined past and longing for a British future. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 336AL - Gender & Genius: The Genesis of Romanticism
This course will explore the Romantic period and the concept of genius from its origins in copyright law to the gender issues arising from the Latin word, ingenium. We will study Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Mary and Percy Shelley, and the paradoxically unconscious state of genius as both a sign of mastery and yet an unmasterable gift. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 336AM - Victorian Masculinities
This course explores the complicated and contested representation of masculinity and manliness in Victorian literature and culture, and examines the ways in which writers created and negotiated a variety of male identities, from the sentimental to the adventurous to the patriarch to the dandy. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 336AN - Romanticism's Nervous Bodies and the Corporeal Imagination
Imagination's centrality to Romantic literature is often construed as part of a devaluation of embodied life. This course reconsiders the imagination's embodiment in texts by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Wollstonecraft, Blake, Edgeworth, and the Shelleys in the context of Romantic medical sciences (neurology and anatomy) and hypochondriacal diseases (hysteria, indigestion, melancholy, racism). ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 336AO - Reading the Victorian Home
The 20th century scorned the Victorian ideal of the “angel in the house,” but modern critics recognize the importance of the lived experience of domestic life. This course reads the representation and material culture of the Victorian home, through such authors as Hemans, Gaskell, Patmore, Dickens, Oliphant, and Trollope. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 336AP - 19th C Political Imagination
A study of selected Victorian texts in several genres, which predict or suggest what's coming next, with respect to politics and society, and how what's coming next should be embraced or resisted, including themes such as: democracy, unions, gender equality, and university education. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 336AQ - 19th Century: Religion & Literature
Once known as "the age of faith and doubt" and later as a flashpoint for the rise of the scientific understanding and secularization, the 19th century is under scrutiny by critics who no longer take for granted religion’s modern decline. This course examines the robust debates in Victorian culture and literature over religion, modernization, and secularization, as well as the internecine conflicts in Christianity itself. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 336AQ or RLST 390BZ.*

ENGL 336AR - 19th Century Lives: Biography and Autobiography
Who were the Victorians? This course invites us to, in Stephen Greenblatt's famous phrase, "speak with the dead": the vanished ancestors and figures of the transatlantic nineteenth century. Drawing on works by working class men and women as well as Indigenous and otherwise racialized men and women, the course considers both what it means to write a life and what that writing tells us about the ones who live it. Students will have the opportunity to research their own family members as well as notable historical figures, and will learn techniques of life-writing. Evaluation: interview, obituary, biography, academic term paper, final examination. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 338AB - Postmodern British Literature
An examination of postmodern currents in British literature from 1980 to the end of the century. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 338AC - Modern British Poetry
A study of modern British poetry. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 338AF - Theatre of the Absurd
This course examines representative Absurdist plays as texts for and in performance. It also considers their philosophical and theatrical foundations and their connection with thinkers and playwrights who have had a significant impact on the development of postmodern critical theory and theatre. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 338AJ - British Writing of World War II
This course offers a study of the often overlooked literature of the war years in Britain that encompasses a variety of genres and styles. It argues for the cohesiveness of the period as a discrete literary moment, defined by its own recurrent tropes, anxieties, and themes. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 339AA - Studies in Poetry: Performance Poetry
Performance Poetry devotes some attention to the historical tradition of oral poetry, from the ancient world to the twentieth century. The major focus is the past century. Topics include: text and audio versions of modernist poems, beat poetry, folk and rock lyrics as poetry, recent spoken word, rap and slam poetry. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 339AB - Literature and the Holocaust
This course examines texts written by survivors of the Holocaust (memoir, fiction, poetry) as well as more recent texts by those by who didn't experience it directly. These texts range from Primo Levi's classic accounts to Art Spiegelman's graphic novel Maus. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 340AA - The Way We Die Now
Living cultures reveal who they are in their treatment of the dead and dying. Advances in medicine, institutionalized health care, and the decline of religion have had a revolutionary impact on how we understand and undergo death. Through a study of recent fiction and drama, this course examines contemporary literature’s picture of the way we die now. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 342AD - Romanticism and Revolution
The Romantic era has been called the age of revolution. While the French Revolution central, there are also major revolutions in the arts, philosophy, and sciences to name the three fields with which we'll be most concerned. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 342AY - City of York Study Abroad
Founded by Rome in 71 AD, York has been key to several moments in literary history: the York Mystery Plays, Shakespeare’s histories, the Victorian Gothic. Featuring two weeks spent at York St. John University, this course offers students a unique immersion in the rich heritage of this historic city. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 349 - Methods for the Study of Literary History
An exploration of methods used in the reading of literary texts in a historical context. Students will be required to write papers which analyze literary texts by means of historical approaches. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Formerly numbered ENGL 210. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 349 and ENGL 210.*

ENGL 351 - Advanced Writing
An advanced course in the theory and practice of writing. Each student will be required to write several papers. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 251, or permission of the Department Head.***

ENGL 352AA - Writing Drama
A specialized workshop in dramatic writing, or playwriting. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 252.*** **Permission of the Department Head is required to register.**

ENGL 352AB - Creative Writing II: Fiction
This course is an advanced workshop in writing narrative fiction, with emphasis on the short story. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 252***

ENGL 352AD - Creative Writing II-Poetry
This course will be an advanced workshop/seminar in the writing of poetry. Our focus will be both practical (attention to line, sound, image, etc) and slightly more theoretical (how does poetry know? what does it know? how does it speak to/with the world etc.). Students will be expected to produce new work and to share it with other participants. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 252.*** *Note: Students wishing to enrol in this course must submit a sample of their creative writing and be interviewed by the instructor before registering.*

ENGL 352AE - Creative Writing II: Playwriting and Writing for Performance
In this course students will receive detailed instruction in playwriting coupled with a discussion of such dramaturgical problems as style, structure and characterization. Students will also receive instruction in writing for diverse performance contexts. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 252.*** **All students wishing to enrol in this course must submit a sample of their creative writing and be interviewed by the instructor before registering.**

ENGL 360 - History of the English Language
The development of the English language from Germanic to Modern English, including changes in phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 260 or LING 100.***

ENGL 367 - Gender and Language
A study of issues related to gender and language, including stylistic variation between genders, differing strategies for dealing with gendered interactions in a social context, the history of sexist language, and debates about political correctness and inclusive language usage. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and 110, or LING 220.*** *Note: Students may not receive credit for one of ENGL 367 or WGST 367. *

ENGL 368AB - Writing Culture(s)
This course examines ways in which writing as a cultural activity informs, infects, controls, and liberates our understanding of discourse communities, disciplinarities, and ideas about social, political, and ethical action. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 368AC - Prison Writing Exchange
Classroom discussion about incarceration and community-based learning will be followed by a series of reading and writing workshops with incarcerated people in a correctional setting. The class will operate as a structured exchange, based in mutual respect and reciprocity, between people that reside on either side of a prison wall. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 371AB - The Novel & The City
This course examines the city as a socially and culturally symbolic setting in novels from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course focuses on the representation of London in novelistic terms. Authors include Charles Dickens, Virginia Woolf and Salman Rushdie. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 371AD - The Novel in Translation
This course examines contemporary novels that were not originally published in English. Among others, we will read texts by Haruki Murkami (Japanese), Jose Saramago (Portuguese), and W.G Sebald (German). ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 371AE - The Literary Gothic
This course will study Gothic Literature, its connections to Romanticism, and its later transformations. It begins with late-eighteenth-century and early-nineteenth-century novels, examined in their contexts, but also includes works from the mid to late-nineteenth-century, showing how the Gothic genre develops into the genres of ghost story, mystery and horror fiction. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 374AB - Studies in the Short Story
Studies in The Short Story, will introduce students to a variety of short fiction, both classical and contemporary, and short story theory. We will use an anthology for breadth and also focus on Alice Munro's collection, Runaway, to examine a short story sequence. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 377AA - Eighteenth-Century Comedy
A study of eighteenth-century comedy, with attention paid to social and political context. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 377AE - Contemporary Comedy
This course will study plays written from the 1960s to the present, and will attempt to define comedy as it appears on the contemporary stage. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 377AE or THEA 456AA.*

ENGL 377AF - Staging the Passion
A study of various texts, medieval to contemporary, that dramatize the events of Christ's passion: his trial, crucifixion, and burial. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 377AF or THEA 454AC.*

ENGL 377AG - Melodrama to Modernism
A survey of European and North American plays written and produced from 1830 to 1950. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 337AG or THST 302AA.*

ENGL 380AB - The English Elegy
An examination of the development of the English elegy as a form of lyric poetry. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 384AB - Narrative & Memory
The relationship between narrative and memory, both personal memory and cultural remembrance. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 384AC - English Literature & the Bible
The English Bible as literature and as cultural phenomenon; the effect of the English Bible on literature in English. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 384AG - Images of Indigenous People
The Forward to Hollywood's Indian: The Portrayal of Native Americans in Film, Wilcomb E. Washburn of the Smithsonian Institute writes, "(the) image of the American Indian, more than that of any other ethnic group, has been shaped by film." Focus of class will be on the representation of Indigenous peoples in contemporary films. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 384AH - Studies in Narrative: The Literature of Pirates
This course will examine some familiar and unfamiliar literary representations of pirates, along with historical documents and contemporary accounts. We will consider the intersection of fiction and history, and will also consider how the popular image of the pirate comments on ideas of masculinity, ethics, and the individual’s relationship to the state. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 384AI - Narratives of Indigenous Activism and Resistance
This course addresses narratives of Indigenous resistance as depicted in literary texts, oral histories, documents, and film. Through textual study, students will unpack the layered histories embedded in their everyday experiences of place and community. Sections may be adapted to specific movements, eras, locations, and interdisciplinary lenses. ***Prerequisite of ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or the completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 386AC - Adventure & the Masculine Idea
Linking gender and genre, this course examines the construction of masculine heroism through a range of texts, from the romance to the classic adventure tale to its re-invention in the hands of seminal contemporary writers. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 386AE - Literature and the Environment
This course examines the development of literature that is aware of and responds to the human relationship with the environment. We will trace the development of environmental literature from the romantics forward, examining poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and eco-criticism. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 386AF - Classic and Contemporary Fairy Tales
This course will study a wide selection of fairy tales, both traditional and modern, paying attention to the relationship between the folk and literary traditions, the thematic content of canonical tales and their variants, and the nature of the tales’ implied audience. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 386AK - Fantasy Literature after Tolkien
J. R. R. Tolkien's "The Lord of The Rings" founded a new mode of fantastic fiction: epic fantasy. This course examines fantasy literature in the decades since Tolkien's towering achievement, with particular attention to new and emerging modes of fantasy. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 386AL - Health, Trauma, and Loss
This course examines literary works that explore trauma and loss and their relation to health and healing. The course focuses on understanding how individuals experience, negotiate, and process illness, trauma, and suffering through the study of poetry and prose beginning in the Renaissance. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AB - Science Fiction
This course is an introduction to the study of science fiction as a literary genre and as a popular cultural phenomenon. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AD - Adapting Shakespeare & Genre
This course focuses on the textual and theatrical dimensions of a variety of modern and pre-20th century Shakespearean adaptations for stage (including dance and musicals) and screen. It also considers the impulses behind adaptation, the nature and effect of various genres of adaptation and their connection with the contemporary hegemony. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AE - Children's Literature
An examination of several well-known books for children, focusing on human relations with the natural world. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AF - Horror Fiction
The course is a survey of the literature of horror (short stories and novels) from the early nineteenth century to the present. Writers include Poe, Le Fanu, Machen, Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, and Steven King: topics include the Gothic, the ghost story, supernatural and psychological horror, vampire fiction, and dark fantasy. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AG - Ideas of the University
Universities have long experienced lively tensions: between free expression and official doctrine; between study for its own sake and study for some marketable purpose; between separation from and integration with the community. These and other themes are explored in a selection of texts centered around the university. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 387AG or ENGL 475AK.*

ENGL 387AH - Television and Genre: Studies in Buffy the Vampire Slayer
This special-topics course will investigate a variety of generic themes within the fantasy television program 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer,' including horror genres, vampire mythologies and literary traditions, critical race issues, and structures of the serial text. Course materials will include critical theory, literature, and episodes from the show. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AI - World Comics
Students will analyze comics as a literary genre and as a cultural vehicle after being introduced to the history and the artistic techniques of the medium. Particular focus will be placed on Francophone "bandes dessinées", but North American comics and Japanese manga will also be included. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AJ - Fantasy Literature: The Sword and Sorcery Tradition
This course investigates the genre of fantasy literature, from Conan the Barbarian to The Song of Ice and Fire. Students will analyze the role of magic and chivalry in this writing, and trace its development from the short story to the mass-market paperback (including its medieval and mythological roots). ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AK - Comics and Cartoons
This course explores comics and cartoons as literature. Topics explored will include interaction between word and image, form and content, and participation of comics in literary, historical, social, and philosophical movements. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AL - British and Canadian Gothic Literature
A survey of the British Gothic as it developed across the long nineteenth century, from its peak in the 1790s to the fin-de-siècle, followed by the study of several contemporary Canadian Gothic texts. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AM - The Culture and Politics of American Superheroes
What can we learn about American politics and culture from the Superhero genre? From debates around American exceptionalism and interventionism to questions of identity and diversification, this course will examine how select narratives and characters are positioned in relation to the American state and society. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AN - Teen Fiction
This course focuses on contemporary young-adult fiction, and we'll look at how YA writers address LGBTQ2+ characters, as well as issues of race, colonialism, and neurodiversity. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 387AO - Detective Fiction
Love a good mystery? We’ll survey the history of detective fiction, including hybrid genres (paranormal), work by women and LGBTQ+ writers, and scholarship on forensic science. Follow a number of unconventional detectives—and try your own hand at detective work—as we explore why this genre remains so fascinating. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 388 - Methods for the Study of Literary Genre
An exploration of methods used in the study of literary genres. Students will be required to write essays which analyze literature according to generic approaches. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 390 - History of Criticism
A chronological study of theories of literary criticism from ancient to modern writers. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 394AC - Early Modern Play of Gender
The course examines the ways in which early modern English drama interrogates gender categories, particularly through its practice of casting boys in women's roles. We study how the one-sex model in early modern England relates to cross-dressing, as well as queer performances and criticism, in five or six selected plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 395AD - Queer Theories: Gender, Sexuality and Ideology
This course will use an interdisciplinary framework to trace the deployment of 'queer' as a political, theoretical, legal and ideological space for living and thinking. We will both analyze and challenge the evolution of queer theory as an academic investment by tracking appearances within literature, cinema, artwork, and critical writing from approximately 1969-present. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 399 - Methods for the Study of Literary Theory
An exploration of methods used in some recent approaches to reading literary texts. Students will be required to write papers which offer textual readings based on the application of these approaches. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or completion of 48 credit hours.***

ENGL 400AA - Beowulf
The aim of this course is to give the student the experience of the Old English epic Beowulf in its original language. The course will focus on translating the text from Old English into Present-Day English, along with discussion of issues of syntax, semantics, poetics (including prosody) and principles of translation. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 405AA - Women & Lit in the Middle Ages
A study of the images of women that dominated medieval culture. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 405AA or ENGL 801AA.*

ENGL 405AB - Middle English Visionary Lit
Middle English writers cas narratives in the form of personal visions to treat a wide variety of subjects. Using both reader response and narrative theory, the course analyses how these authors construct the fictional audience, as they speak on matters of vital concern. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 405AB or ENGL 801AB.*

ENGL 405AD - Medieval Materialism
This honours/grad course will concentrate on the medieval material world and the five senses, including texts that engage with: arms and armour, stained glass, the elements and eco-criticism, fashion, animal lives, and magic as a material force. We’ll read texts in both their original languages and translations. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 405AD or ENGL 801AD.*

ENGL 410AA - Spenser: The Faerie Queene
This course will read all six books of the Faerie Queene as a struggle with the dangers of idolatry. It also focuses on Spenser's concern for the private and public virtues, especially with the "politics of friendship". *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 410AA or ENGL 802AA.*

ENGL 410AB - Marlowe and Shakespeare
This course treats Marlowe and Shakespeare as early modern dramatists who both overreach traditional categories in developing their own personal mythology. We examine 3-5 of Marlowe's canonical plays in relation to the 3-5 plays of Shakespeare with which they have been most often compared. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 410AB or ENGL 802AB.*

ENGL 410AC - Poststructuralism and Shakespeare
This course uses select plays by Shakespeare as test cases to examine the challenges presented by five poststructuralist approaches - deconstruction, psychoanalysis, Marxism, feminism, and queer theory. The course explores how poststructuralism aids us in formulating an ethics of the other in Shakespeare's plays. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 410AC or ENGL 802AC.*

ENGL 410AE - Shakespeare as Cultural Icon
This course examines the ways in which Shakespeare has been used as a national and international icon, both to maintain institutionalized power and to serve as a resistance point for underprivileged groups. We trace this fundamental paradox through the cultural reception of four popular, contested plays in the Shakespeare canon. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 410AE or ENGL 802AE.*

ENGL 415AB - Shakespeare
A study of one or more aspects of Shakespeare's works. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 415AB or ENGL 803AB.*

ENGL 415AC - Renaissance Lyric Poetry
This course examines English Renaissance lyric poetry in the light of current scholarship on emerging concepts of self in the early-modern period. The primary focus is to examine the variety of lyric poetic voices of this period, particularly of the seventeenth century. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 415AC or ENGL 803AC.*

ENGL 415AD - Preachers, Players & Community
This course examines what early modern players and preachers had in common and how their "performances" contributed to cultural formation. It also explores the nature of the communication network within which they operated and its similarities to our own electronic web. Texts include plays, sermons, documentary and pictorial evidence. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 415AD, ENGL 803AD, or THEA 810AA.*

ENGL 415AF - The Body in 17th Century Literature
Using a number of theoretical approaches, we will examine representations of the body and its functions in literary and medical texts from the 17th century. We will consider how these representations reflect cultural values and perpetuate gender, economic, naturalist, and colonialist ideology. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 415AF or ENGL 803AF.*

ENGL 415AG - Gender and Shrew-Taming Plays
We will explore literary depictions of gender relations and other hierarchies of power by focusing on four shrew-taming plays of the late 16th and 17th centuries: The Taming of A Shrew, The Taming of The Shrew, The Woman's Prize, and Sauny the Scot. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 415AH - Colonialism & Renaissance Lit
We will explore the influence of the 'discovery' of the New World on early modern literature and culture, considering, for example, reactions to new lands, peoples, products (like tobacco), and diseases. We will focus on English texts from the seventeenth century, including travel writing, religious tracts, poetry, and drama. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 415AH or ENGL 803AH.*

ENGL 420AA - Jonathan Swift
The major works of Jonathan Swift. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 420AB - She-Tragedy
This course examines the phenomenon of the female scapegoat, who is intended to serve both as a cure and an indictment for society's sexual double standard, in representative male-authored tragic drama of the 17th and 18th centuries. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 420AB or ENGL 804AB.*

ENGL 420AC - 18 Century Women's Fiction
This course will examine a selection of fiction written by women between 1688 and 1798 using several theoretical approaches. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 420AC or ENGL 804AC.*

ENGL 420AD - Sexual and Textual Transgression in Baroque and Augustan Literature
This course examines the various ways that seventeenth- and eighteenth century writers transgress social, political and religious conventions. The course will focus especially on the way sexual transgression acts as a metaphor for literary transgression. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 420AD or ENGL 804AD*

ENGL 420AE - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama
This course will sample some of the plays written between 1660 and 1700. Although the primary focus of the plays will be on comedy, the selections will include a broad sample of genres, including heroic tragedy, tragedy, experimental farce, and ballad opera. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 420AE or ENGL 804AE.*

ENGL 420AF - Melancholy/Madness 18-Century
This course explores the under-belly of the so-called "Age of Reason" by examining a range of literary and medical representations of melancholy and madness. We will supplement our investigations with a series of critical texts, and topics of discussion will centre around the relationship between 18th-century mental illness and gender, genius, culture, and creativity. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 420AF or ENGL 804AF.*

ENGL 420AH - 18th Century Other Worlds: Women's Writing and Exploration
In this class, advanced English students will enter closely into a study of important trends in 18th century women's writing and into the ways that those authors contribute exploration of new worlds, whether fictional, actual, or through travel and first-hand experience. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 420AP - Eighteenth Century Sexualities
This seminar will explore issues of gender and sexuality in Eighteenth Century culture, including literature, artwork, music, and fashion. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 420AP or ENGL 820AP.*

ENGL 420AQ - The Golden Age of Piracy and its Contexts
The literary image of the pirate—including dress, speech, and demeanour—stems from a very specific historical period, namely, the years from 1715 to 1730, generally known as the final phase of the Golden Age of Piracy (roughly 1680 to 1730). During this period, the British government undertook to eradicate pirate activity in the Caribbean, installing Woodes Rogers as governor of The Bahamas, and charging him with waging a “war on piracy” that successfully drove piracy out of North America by 1726. This course will consider the literature about pirates that emerged during this period. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 420AQ or ENGL 804AG.*

ENGL 425AA - John Keats
This course explores the writings and life of John Keats. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 425AA or ENGL 805AA.*

ENGL 425AB - The Romantic Lyric
The Romantic Lyric: A study of Romantic Subjectivism & Imagination as expressed in the Ode & the Sonnet - 1798-1822 - Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 425AB or ENGL 805AB.*

ENGL 425AE - Knowing Feeling: Romantic Affects
Romanticism is typically—almost stereotypically—concerned with feeling. What did the Romantics think about the role of feeling? Why and how did feeling become so important? To explore these questions we will read literary, scientific, and philosophical texts in the context of contemporary affect theory. Assessment: seminar, précis, essay, exam *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 425AE or ENGL 805AE.*

ENGL 425AF - Representations of Judaism from Romanticism to Modernity
Beginning with literary contexts from the Bible, Jewish mythology, and Shakespeare, this course ultimately focuses on British representations of Judaism from the mid 18th to the late 19th century. The aim is to investigate how “Judaism,” as imagined by various artists, complicates narratives of historical and national identity in England. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 425AF or ENGL 805AF.*

ENGL 425AG - Shelley’s Monsters: Mary Shelley’s Life and Art
This course focuses on the topic of monstrosity in several of Mary Shelley’s novels, some of her short stories and essays, and her editing work. We will read these texts in biographical context and alongside shorter contributions by Percy Shelley and Lord Byron. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 425AH - Labor and Longing in British Romantic Poetry
How does Romantic poetry capture what it means to work, labour or serve; to be productive or creative; to work for oneself or for others? Whether the choice to work is made freely or under coercion, including threats of suffering, imprisonment or death, work was both transforming, historically, and transformative. ***Prerequisite of ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or the completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Intended for English Honours or prospective English Honours students only. Students who are not English Honours majors require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 430AB - Victorian Social-Justice Novel
A study of the conventions of, and the political philosophies underlying, the Victorian social justice novel. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 430AB or ENGL 811AA.*

ENGL 430AC - Transition to Modernity
This course examines the changes in the relation between the individual and society, in available epistemological frameworks, in gender identities, and in the representation of desire through the study of texts written in England between 1860 and 1920. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 430AC or ENGL 806AC.*

ENGL 430AH - Victorian Literature: Liberalism & Social Justice Novel
The course treats liberal political philosophy as a key but occluded context for Victorian social-justice novels. Topics include public and private space, and their right relationship; political rights and the juridical person; women, class, and suffrage; parliamentary and social reform; and the role of education in bringing rights into being. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 430AH or ENGL 806AH.*

ENGL 430AI - Inventing England: Myths of Nationhood and Nationalism n the Long 19th Century
Beginning with Benedict Anderson's touchstone Imagined Communities this course examines modern thinking about the meaning of nations and nationalism in texts and cultural expressions ranging from Nelson's column to Tennyson's Idylls of the King. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 430AJ - Studies in the Nineteenth Century: Crimes and Misdemeanours
This course examines ideas of Victorian social order through their opposite or underside, disorder, with particular reference to the ideas of crime and sin, and to theories of criminality, punishment, and rehabilitation, in high realist texts as well as sensation and detective fiction. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 430AL - Faith and Doubt
Was the Victorian Age really one of a crisis of faith, of spreading doubt in the hoary old conventions of Christianity which marked a necessary passage to Modernism and Modernity? Or was the apparent growth of secularism in the British 19th century a mark of something else altogether? This course examines the literature of faith and doubt, from the poems of Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning to the novels of Dickens, Eliot, and Elizabeth Gaskell from the perspective of new scholarship on Victorian religion, inviting critics to take seriously, as did the Victorians themselves, their own thinking about religion and the spiritual life. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 435AC - Repetition in British Lit
This course examines theories by Vico, Freud, Kierkegaard and Benjamin to reveal the complex nature of repetition as a cultural form. These theories are applied to recent British novels, all of which employ repetition as a key narrative structure. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 435AE - The Great War
This course examines the cultural history of the First World War. Through a multidisciplinary approach and the analysis of varied cultural artifacts--from memoirs, poetry and fiction to film, architecture and the visual arts--the course explores the impact of the "Great War" on the collective imaginations of Europeans. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 435AK - T. S. Eliot
An overview of the career and development of T. S. Eliot, one of the most influential poets and critics of the twentieth century, this course will examine the collected verse, as well as selected plays and critical work. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 435AK or ENGL 807AK.*

ENGL 435AL - Holocaust Literature
This is a course on the study of Holocaust Literature written in English. We will study a range of genres, including memoir, novel, short fiction, poetry, drama, and other media to seek to understand the complexity of Holocaust representation in literature. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 435AL or ENGL 807AL.*

ENGL 435AM - Evelyn Waugh
Literary iconoclast/cultural conservative, ruthless satirist/devout Catholic: Evelyn Waugh seems a contradiction. Yet he is widely hailed, even by those unsympathetic to his values, as one of the great stylists of his century. This course offers a comprehensive measure of Waugh’s diverse achievements over 37 years as a writer. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 435AM or ENGL 807AM.*

ENGL 435AN - Modernism & Problem of History
This course examines how the acceleration of contemporary life brought about by new technologies posed for modernists a problem of representation they met with formal innovation, and how history’s morally troubling character spurred the forging of new myths to account for the repeated return of past strife and oppressions. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 435AO - Holocaust Lit. & Ethics
This course uses Kant's ethical and aesthetic theory as a helpful way of understanding how inmates experienced a perversion of normality in Auschwitz-Birkenau. If Kant saw beauty as a means of creating community and the categorical imperative as a unifying mode of ethical action, writers such as Charlotte Delbo and Primo Levi describe experiences that cannot be contained by Kant's thinking. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 435AP - Security and Surveillance: The Making of "Bad" Subjects
This course will use Foucault's mid-1970s lectures on security and surveillance as a starting point to discuss how bodies and behaviours are policed. We will discuss how some cultural texts play a role in producing "good" citizens, while others challenge the boundaries that delimit what it is to be human. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 440AD - Canadian Poetry Since 1970
This course will focus on a reading of poetic works of the last 30 or so years. Major improvements, significant shifts, and the work of widely read poets will be examined. We will explore the roles of small presses and literary magazines in the dissemination of contemporary writing in Canada. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 440AD or ENGL 808AD.*

ENGL 440AI - Canadian Literature: Atwood
For Margaret Atwood, literature is a powerful complex of self-fashioning, imagining and eyewitnessing, which is never stable or morally neutral. This course examines Atwood's national, environmental, humanitarian and feminist concerns, as well as her postmodern aesthetics and her experimentation with genre. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 440AI or ENGL 808AI.*

ENGL 440AJ - Mourning and Memorial in Canadian Literature
A Study of mourning and memorial in Canadian literature with a focus on poetry and prose post 1950; includes theoretical grounding in mourning, memorial, and culture. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 440AJ or ENGL 808AK.*

ENGL 440AK - Testimony, Witness, and Indigenous Literatures
This course draws upon Indigenous and Western theories of trauma, testimony, and witness to examine and query contemporary Indigenous literatures' engagement with telling the trauma story through fiction for pedagogical, therapeutic, and activist purposes. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 440AK or ENGL 808AL.*

ENGL 440AL - Indigenous Feminism and Women's Writings
During this seminar class, students will engage in critical discussions involving justice and power for/by Indigenous women, gendered violence, Indigenous feminism, intergenerational trauma, women’s residential school narratives and literary writings as restorative justice. Through lectures, readings, and screenings, students will develop critical and interdisciplinary tools for analyzing Indigenous literary discourses. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 440AN - "Wriggling through the universe as beams of light"; Eden Robinson and the Decolonial Gothic
This seminar-style course examines the work of Haisla/Heiltsuk author, Eden Robinson, including short stories and a novella in Traplines (1996), her first novel, Monkey Beach (2000), and her recent Trickster Trilogy: Son of a Trickster (2017), Trickster Drift (2018), and Return of the Trickster (2021). *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 440AO - Saskatchewan Indigenous Literatures
This course explores some of the richest and oldest stories in the lands now called Saskatchewan, including voices from Cree, Saulteaux, Dakota, Lakota, Nakoda, Dene, and Métis nations. Materials will include oral traditions, early writings, historical letters, speeches by chiefs and elders, and life writings, in addition to contemporary literary works in all genres. ***Prerequisite of ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or the completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 440AO or ENGL 808AO.* *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 445AJ - Cormac McCarthy
An intensive study of an extraordinary novelist and stylist, tracing his development through five decades and several genres. Beginning with his gothic explorations of the American South, we follow him to the Southwest, and backwards and forwards in time, as he reworks the Western, the thriller, and apocalyptic dystopia. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 445AJ or ENGL 809AJ.*

ENGL 465AA - Writing Fixed-Form Poetry
This advanced poetry course involves the study of ways in which contemporary poets innovate, subvert, or reject inherited fixed forms. Students will analytically "frame" and lead one workshop for the creative writers in the class, and will themselves workshop a comprehensive research paper. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 465AA or ENGL 465CA.*

ENGL 465AB - Writing the Lyric Self
This course is an intensive workshop in the craft and practice of creative writing with detailed instruction in genre-based criticism. Students are invited to consider the contemporary lyric poetic voice in relation to poles of literary impersonality and confession, and in relation to various strategies of music, prose and drama. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 465AB or ENGL 813AN.*

ENGL 465CA - CW:Writing Fixed-Form Poetry
In this advanced creative writing course, experienced student poets will experiment with traditional poetic forms and study ways in which contemporary poets innovate, subvert or reject fixed form. The course aims to develop students’ reflective relationship to formalism in their personal poetics, even if they choose to write free verse. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 4465CA or ENGL 813CA.*

ENGL 475AF - Utopian Literature
Study of a number of works significant in the Utopian tradition, with attention to: Historical and cultural contexts; themes such as politics, education, the arts, and gender roles; literary features of the genre; and related issues such as the intentional community and city planning. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 475AF or ENGL 815AF.*

ENGL 475AL - Creative Non-Fiction: The Experimental Memoir
This course is a study of creative non-fiction (the memoir and lyric essay), and how this kind of writing differs from the novel. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 475AM - Indigenous Science Fiction and Speculative Storytelling
This course examines the relatively untapped genre of Indigenous Science Fiction and Speculative Storytelling. We will cover nearly all of the available Indigenous science fiction literature from Canada and the U.S.A. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 475AN - Special Studies in Genre: Screening the Text: Modes of Fidelity in Film Adaptation+
This is a genre course focusing on the film adaptations of a variety of source texts. It will review contemporary adaptation theory, note its links to the classic problems of literary interpretation, and pursue a critical discourse based on modes of fidelity and infidelity in the text. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 475AP - CW: Writing Genre
This honors-level creative writing seminar will focus on popular genres, including fantasy/science-fiction, detective fiction, horro, YA literatures, and digital genres. Students will work-shop heir own creative texts while also reading criticism on genre studies and the craft of writing. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 475AQ - Women's Memoir: Theory and Practice
This seminar examines the genre of women's memoir through both a critical and creative lens. We analyze several contemporary women's memoirs while gaining practice in the craft of memoir writing. Feminist and gender theory enables us to understand as well as trouble categories such as woman, identity, memory, and narration. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 475AU - Fantasy Literature
This seminar will examine the development of fantasy literature, from its early medieval roots to the work of contemporary writers such as Guy Gavriel Kay. Students will trace connections between the chivalric tradition and contemporary fantasy, while reading critical materials on the genre. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 475AY - Histories of Childhood
This course examines childhood as a historical concept, a literary representation, and a media phenomenon. We’ll look at experiences of Medieval children, examine Shakespeare’s treatment of adolescence (along with queer/non-traditional adaptations), the development of children’s literature during the 19C, & a variety of children’s/YA texts that engage with ecology and dystopia. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 475AY or ENGL 880AY.*

ENGL 475AZ - The Making of Modern Fantasy: 1700 - 1950
This course studies the shifts in fantasy literature as both genre and mode from the 18th century, when it emerges as a recognizable genre, to The Lord of the Rings, the keystone text of modern fantasy. It takes up, also, the shifts and changes in the theory of fantasy, from 19th century considerations of the novel and the romance to Todorov, Shippey, Clute, Mendelsohn, and Attebery. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 475AZ or ENGL 815AZ.*

ENGL 475BA - Mourning and Memorial in North American Literature
Focusing primarily on the period post-1950, this course examines how the literary culture of North America responds to literary traditions of mourning and memorializing in a period that poses serious challenges to the efficacy of remembrance. Theoretical and literary works form the focus of the readings. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 475BA or ENGL 815BA.*

ENGL 475CL - CW: Creative Non-Fiction: The Experimental Memoir
Creative Writing Section: This course is a study of creative non-fiction (the memoir and lyric essay), and how this kind of writing differs from the novel. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 475CL or ENGL 475AL.*

ENGL 475CQ - CW: Women's Memoir: Theory and Practice
This seminar examines the genre of women's memoir through both a critical and creative lens. We analyze several contemporary women's memoirs while practicing and workshopping the craft of memoir writing. Feminist and gender theory enables us to understand as well as trouble categories such as woman, identity, memory, and narration. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 475CU - Creative Writing: Writing Fantasy
This course will focus on writing fantasy in a number of forms. We’ll tackle the epic to the postmodern, and discuss the inner workings of the genre-fiction industry. Along the way, we’ll read works of literary/popular fantasy across historical periods. Students will submit a final portfolio with a critical introduction. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 475CU, ENGL 820AU, or ENGL 820CU.*

ENGL 480AD - After Theory: Politics & Theory
Theory and practise often become the opposition between theory and politics where theory is reproached for not being sufficiently political. This course looks at the political relevance of efficacy of theory. It examines the reasons for theoretical resistance, and studies the emergence of Cultural Studies. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 480AD or ENGL 817AD.*

ENGL 480AF - “The Age of Poets”: Philosophy and Poetry in the Twentieth Century
This course examines Heidegger’s proposition that “The thinker says Being. The poet names the holy.” Our focus is on Heidegger and Hölderlin, then turns to Jacques Derrida and Paul Celan. We will conclude with Alain Badiou’s pronouncement that the “Age of Poets,” Heidegger’s “suture” of philosophy to poetry, is over. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 480AG - Philosophical Ethics and the Zombies
Embodying contemporary anxieties of apocalyptic disaster, zombies summon fundamental ethical questions. This course examines the zombie in literature, film, the graphic novel, and the TV series The Walking Dead through the lens of bio-ethical theory and philosophers such as Kant, Nietzsche, Jonas, Arendt and Levinas. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 480AH - Rhetoric of Apology in Canada
This course examines the rhetoric of government apologies in Canada as national mythologies or narratives of forgiving and forgetting government policies that defined, “who belongs and who does not belong to the nation.” We will examine the ideological underpinnings of apologies and attempts at reconciliation through Canadian tragedies. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 480AH or ENGL 817AH.*

ENGL 480AI - Literary & Environmental Ethics: Ecocriticism, Ecology, Ecotechnics
This course examines two Canadian novels and three philosophers to ask, What is an environmental ethics? How does nature relate to the concept of environment, world, or creation? We investigate the concept of nature, guided by economic, technological, scientific, or religious thinking, to rethink humanity's dominion over plants and animals. ***Prerequisite: ENGL 100 and either ENGL 110 or the completion of 48 credit hours.*** *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 480AI or ENGL 817AI.* *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 485AB - Postcolonial Literature/Theory
An examination of writing in English from former British colonies in the Pacific, Africa, Caribbean, South Asia, and Canada. We will study such current debates as universality and difference, representation and resistance, nationalism, hybridity, feminism, and language. Students will lead the discussion by presenting seminars on a variety of topics. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 485AD - Adv Studies Creative Writing
This course combines creative writing with an analysis of what it means to compose literary texts. Students will read various works in which writers such as Annie Dillard, Raymond Carver and William Vollman discuss composition. Assignments will involve creative writing on personal essays. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 485AK - Advanced Studies in Genre/Creative Writing
This course is an intensive workshop in the craft and practice of creative writing with detailed instruction in genre-based criticism. It aims to eluciate connections between the student's own writing and the literary and critical traditions that they seek to join. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.* *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 485AK or ENGL 820AK.*

ENGL 485AL - Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry
This course is an intensive workshop in creative writing with detailed instruction in poetry. The main focus of the course is to develop a manuscript of poems examining a central topic. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 485AO - Advanced Creative Writing
This course is an intensive workshop in the craft and practice of creative writing. It will focus on creative non-fiction, short fiction, and poetry. Students will also learn the rudiments of editing as they work with one another's manuscripts. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 485AV - You Are Here: The Power of Place in Creative Writing
This seminar explores the significance of place and world-building in creative writing. Whether you're describing a fantastic city, or simply one’s own room, the imaginative language of place is vital. Through a series of workshops on both fiction and creative non-fiction, this class will converse about the landscape of writing. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 485AW - Ekphrasis: Theory & Practice
This class discusses the theory of ekphrasis, examines a series of ekphrastic texts, and gives students practice in ekphrastic writing. The bulk of the class is devoted to student workshops in which their ekphrastic writing - poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, or scholarly analysis - will be analyzed by the class. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 485AZ - Literature and the Anthropocene
Numerous scientists, philosophers and artists believe that humans have recently entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, an epoch that is defined by the ways that human civilization has fundamentally altered the Earth. This class is a hybrid class, meaning that it can be taken for academic or creative writing credit. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 485CW - CW: Ekphrasis: Theory & Practice
*Creative Writing Section* This class discusses the theory of ekphrasis, examines a series of ekphrastic texts, and gives students practice in ekphrastic writing. The bulk of the class is devoted to student workshops in which their ekphrastic writing - poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, or scholarly analysis - will be analyzed by the class. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 485CZ - CW: Literature and the Anthropocene
Numerous scientists, philosophers and artists believe that humans have recently entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, an epoch that is defined by the ways that human civilization has fundamentally altered the Earth. This class is a hybrid class, meaning that it can be taken for academic or creative writing credit. This is the creative writing section. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 490 - Honours Essay I
Work towards an Honours Essay. Students will be expected to submit a draft or preliminary work. As an alternative to a scholarly treatise, the essay may take the form of a creative work with a critical introduction. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 491 - Honours Essay II
Completion of an Honours Essay, which will be graded by the supervisor in consultation with another member of the faculty. As an alternative to a scholarly treatise, the essay may take the form of a creative work with a critical introduction. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 499 - Bibliography and Methods of Research
The goal of this course is to teach techniques of literary research, the process of textual transmission, the editing process, and physical composition of books. Students will have the opportunity to research manuscript documents and variants. *Note: This course is intended for ENGL Honours students. Students who are not ENGL Honours students require permission of the Department Head to register.*

ENGL 801AD - Medieval Materialism
This grad course will concentrate on the medieval material world and the five senses, including texts that engage with: arms and armour, stained glass, the elements and eco-criticism, fashion, animal lives, and magic as a material force. We’ll read texts in both their original languages and translations. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 801AD or ENGL 405AD.*

ENGL 802AA - Spenser: The Faerie Queene
This course will read all six books of the Faerie Queene as a struggle with the dangers of idolatry. It also focusses on Spenser's concern for the private and public virtues, especially with the "politics of friendship." *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 802AA or ENGL 410AA.*

ENGL 802AC - Poststucturalism and Shakespeare
This course uses select plays by Shakespeare as test cases to examine the challenges presented by five poststructuralist approaches - deconstruction, psychoanalysis, Marxism, feminism, and queer theory. The course explores how poststructuralism aids us in formulating an ethics of the other in Shakespeare's plays. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 802AC or ENGL 410AC.*

ENGL 802AE - Shakespeare as Cultural Icon
This course examines the ways in which Shakespeare has been used as a national and international icon, both to maintain institutionalized power and to serve as a resistance point for underprivileged groups. We trace this fundamental paradox through the cultural reception of four popular, contested plays in the Shakespeare canon. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 802AE or ENGL 410AE.*

ENGL 803AF - The Body in 17th Century Literature
Using a number of theoretical approaches, we will examine representations of the body and its functions in literary and medical texts from the 17th century. We will consider how these representations reflect cultural values and perpetuate gender, economic, nationalist, and colonialist ideology. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 803AF or ENGL 415AF.*

ENGL 803AG - Gender and Shrew-Taming Plays
We will explore literary depictions of gender relations and other hierarchies of power by focusing on four shrew-taming plays of the late 16th and 17th centuries: The Taming of A Shrew, The Taming of The Shrew, The Woman's Prize, and Sauny the Scot. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 803AG or ENGL 415AG.*

ENGL 803AH - Colonialism & Renaissance Lit
We will explore the influence of the 'discovery' of the New World on early modern literature and culture, considering, for example, reactions to new lands, peoples, products (like tobacco), and diseases. We will focus on English texts from the seventeenth century, including travel writing, religious tracts, poetry, and drama. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 803AH or ENGL 415AH.*

ENGL 803AI - Early Modern Emotions
We will explore understandings of the emotions in the long seventeenth century, paying particular attention to representations of the emotional lives of non-human animals. Readings will include literary works as well as medical, philosophical, proto-psychological, and religious texts.

ENGL 804AB - She-Tragedy
This course examines the phenomenon of the female scapegoat, who is intended to serve both as a cure and an indictment for society's sexual double standard, in representative male-authored tragic drama of the 17th and 18th centuries. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 804AB or ENGL 420AB.*

ENGL 804AC - 18th Century Women's Fiction
This course will examine a selection of fiction written by women between 1688 and 1798 using several theoretical approaches. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 804AC or ENGL 420AC.*

ENGL 804AD - Sexual and Textual Transgression in Baroque and Augustan Literature
This course examines the various ways that seventeenth- and eighteenth-century writers transgress social, political and religious conventions. The course will focus especially on the way sexual transgressions act as a metaphor for literary transgression. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 804AD or ENGL 420AD.*

ENGL 804AF - Melancholy & Madness in the 18th-Century
This course explores the under-belly of the so-called "Age of Reason" by examining a range of literary and medical representations of melancholy and madness. We will supplement our investigations with a series of critical texts, and topics of discussion will center around the relationship between eighteenth-century mental illness and gender, genius, culture, and creativity. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 804AF or ENGL 420AF.*

ENGL 804AG - The Golden Age of Piracy and its Contexts
The literary image of the pirate-including dress, speech, and demeanour-stems from a very specific historical period, namely, the years from 1715 to 1730, generally known as the final phase of the Golden Age of Piracy (roughly 1680 to 1730). During this period, the British government undertook to eradicate pirate activity in the Caribbean, installing Woodes Rogers as governor of The Bahamas, and charging him with waging a "war on piracy" that successfully drove piracy out of North America by 1726. This course will consider the literature about pirates that emerged during this period. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 804AG or ENGL 420AQ.*

ENGL 805AE - Knowing Feeling: Romantic Affects
Romanticism is typically—almost stereotypically—concerned with feeling. What did the Romantics think about the role of feeling? Why and how did feeling become so important? To explore these questions we will read literary, scientific, and philosophical texts in the context of contemporary affect theory. Assessment: seminar, précis, essay, exam. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 805AE or ENGL 425AE.*

ENGL 805AF - Representations of Judaism from Romanticism to Modernity
Beginning with literary contexts from the Bible, Jewish mythology, and Shakespeare, this course ultimately focuses on British representations of Judaism from the mid 18th to the late 19th century. The aim is to investigate how “Judaism,” as imagined by various artists, complicates narratives of historical and national identity in England. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 805AF or ENGL 425AF.*

ENGL 805AG - Shelley’s Monsters: Mary Shelley’s Life and Art
This course focuses on the topic of monstrosity in several of Mary Shelley’s novels, some of her short stories and essays, and her editing work. We will read these texts in biographical context and alongside shorter contributions by Percy Shelley and Lord Byron. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 805AG or ENGL 425AG.*

ENGL 805AH - Labor and Longing in British Romantic Poetry
How does Romantic poetry capture what it means to work, labour or serve; to be productive or creative; to work for oneself or for others? Whether the choice to work is made freely or under coercion, including threats of suffering, imprisonment or death, work was both transforming, historically, and transformative. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 805AH or ENGL 425AH.*

ENGL 806AH - Victorian Literature: Liberalism and Social Justice Novel
This course treats liberal political philosophy as a key but occluded context for Victorian social-justice novels. Topics include public and private space, and their right relationship; political rights and the juridicial person; women, class, and suffrage; parliamentary and social reform; and the role of education in bringing rights into being. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 806AH or ENGL 430AH.*

ENGL 806AI - Inventing England: Myths of Nationhood and Nationalism in the Long 19th Century
Beginning with Benedict Anderson's touchstone Imagined Communities this course examines modern thinking about the meaning of nations and nationalism in texts and cultural expressions ranging from Nelson's column to Tennyson's Idylls of the King.

ENGL 806AJ - Studies in the Nineteenth Century: Crimes and Misdemeanours
This course examines ideas of Victorian social order through their opposite or underside, disorder, with particular reference to the ideas of crime and sin, and to theories of criminality, punishment, and rehabilitation, in high realist texts as well as sensation and detective fiction. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 806AJ or ENGL 430AJ.*

ENGL 806AL - Studies in 19th C.: Faith & Doubt
This course examines literature of faith and doubt, from poems of Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, and Browning to novels of Dickens, Eliot, and Gaskell from the perspective of new scholarship on Victorian religion, inviting critics to take seriously, as the Victorians did, their own thinking about religion and the spiritual life. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 806AL or ENGL 430AL.*

ENGL 806AN - 19th Century Print Culture
This course traces the rapid transformation of the textual environment of 19th century Britain as a consequence of new technologies of printing and dramatic increases in literacy rates, through periodicals, newspapers, and printed ephemera, as well as the ways these forms of print culture transformed established literary genres.

ENGL 806AO - Advanced Studies in Victorian Literature: George Eliot
This is an advanced study in the life and work of the Victorian realist author, George Eliot (Mary Ann / Marian Evans), with a balance between major novels (Middlemarch, The Mill on the Floss) and smaller works, such as the fairy-tale like novella, Silas Marner, and the early Scenes of Clerical Life. Required reading will include Nancy Henry's recent biography of Eliot and a range of critical and recent scholarship on Eliot. See attached list.

ENGL 807AK - T. S. Eliot
An overview of the career and development of T. S. Eliot, one of the most influential poets and critics of the twentieth century, this course will examine the collected verse, as well as selected plays and critical work. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 807AK or ENGL 435AK.*

ENGL 807AL - Advanced Holocaust Literature
This is a course on the study of Holocaust Literature written in English We will study a range of genres, including memoir, novel, short fiction, poetry, drama, and other media to seek to understand the complexity of Holocaust representation in literature. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 807AL or ENGL 435AL.*

ENGL 807AM - Evelyn Waugh
Literary iconoclast/cultural conservative, ruthless satirist/devout Catholic: Evelyn Waugh seems a contradiction. Yet he is widely hailed, even by those unsympathetic to his values, as one of the great stylists of his century. This course offers a comprehensive measure of Waugh’s diverse achievements over 37 years as a writer. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 807AM or ENGL 435AM.*

ENGL 807AN - Modernism & Problem of History
This course examines how the acceleration of contemporary life brought about by new technologies posed for modernists a problem of representation they met with formal innovation, and how history’s morally troubling character spurred the forging of new myths to account for the repeated return of past strife and oppressions. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 807AN or ENGL 435AN.*

ENGL 807AP - Security and Surveillance: The Making of "Bad" Subjects
This course will use Foucault's mid-1970s lectures on security and surveillance as a starting point to discuss how bodies and behaviours are policed. We will discuss how some cultural texts play a role in producing "good" citizens, while others challenge the boundaries that delimit what it is to be human.

ENGL 808AD - Canadian Poetry Since 1970
This course will focus on a reading of key poetic works of the last thirty or so years. Major movements, significant shifts, and work of widely read poets will be examined. We will explore the roles of small presses and literary magazines in the dissemination of contemporary writing in Canada. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 808AD or ENGL 440AD.*

ENGL 808AI - Canadian Literature: Atwood
For Margaret Atwood, literature is a powerful complex of self-fashioning, imagining and eyewitnessing, which is never stable or morally neutral. This course examines Atwood's national, environmental, humanitarian and feminist concerns, as well as her postmodern aesthetics and her experimentation with genre. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 808AI or ENGL 440AI.*

ENGL 808AK - Mourning and Memorial in Canadian Literature
A Study of mourning and memorial in Canadian literature with a focus on poetry and prose post 1950; includes theoretical grounding in mourning, memorial, and culture. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 808AK or ENGL 440AJ.*

ENGL 808AL - Testimony, Witness, and Indigenous Literatures
This course draws upon Indigenous and Western theories of trauma, testimony, and witness to examine and query contemporary Indigenous literatures' engagement with telling the trauma story through fiction for pedagogical, therapeutic, and activist purposes. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 808AL or ENGL 440AK.*

ENGL 808AM - Indigenous Feminism and Women's Writings
During this seminar class, students will engage in critical discussions involving justice and power for/by Indigenous women, gendered violence, Indigenous feminism, intergenerational trauma, women’s residential school narratives and literary writings as restorative justice. Through lectures, readings, and screenings, students will develop critical and interdisciplinary tools for analyzing Indigenous literary discourses.

ENGL 808AN - "Wriggling through the universe as beams of light": Eden Robinson and the Decolonial Gothic
This seminar-style course examines the work of Haisla/Heiltsuk author, Eden Robinson, including short stories and a novella in Traplines (1996), her first novel, Monkey Beach (2000), and her recent Trickster Trilogy: Son of a Trickster (2017), Trickster Drift (2018), and Return of the Trickster (2021). *Intended for Graduate Students in English*

ENGL 808AO - Saskatchewan Indigenous Literatures
This course explores some of the richest and oldest stories in the lands now called Saskatchewan, including voices from Cree, Saulteaux, Dakota, Lakota, Nakoda, Dene, and Métis nations. Materials will include oral traditions, early writings, historical letters, speeches by chiefs and elders, and life writings, in addition to contemporary literary works in all genres. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 808AO or ENGL 440AO.*

ENGL 809AJ - Cormac McCarthy
An intensive study of an extraordinary novelist and stylist, tracing his development through five decades and several genres. Beginning with his gothic explorations of the American South, we follow him to the Southwest, and backwards and forwards in time, as he reworks the Western, the the thriller, and apocalyptic dystopia. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 809AJ or ENGL 445AJ.*

ENGL 812DA - Dramaturging & Devising Inclusive Theatre
The student will contribute a theoretical context and dramaturgical framework for THEA 315AB, a course that offers UG students the opportunity to explore inclusive theatre practices inpublic performances. It is aimed at those who are interested in collaborative/ devised theatre practice especially those who self-declare as otherwise-abled or are interested in exploring such possibilities. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 812DA or THEA 315AB.*

ENGL 813AD - Writing Fixed Form Poetry
This advanced poetry course involves the study of ways in which contemporary poets innovate, subvert, or reject inherited fixed forms. Students will develop a conference-style paper on formalism for presentation to the class and will workshop a comprehensive research paper. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 813AD, ENGL 465AA, ENGL 465CA, or ENGL 813CA.*

ENGL 813AE - Writing the Lyric Self
This course is an intensive workshop in the craft and practice of creative writing with detailed instruction in genre-based criticism. Students are invited to consider the contemporary lyric poetic voice in relation to poles of literary impersonality and confession, and in relation to various strategies of music, prose and drama. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 813AE or ENGL 465AB.*

ENGL 813CA - CW: Writing Fixed-Form Poetry
In this advanced creative writing course, experienced student poets will experiment with traditional poetic forms and study ways in which contemporary poets innovate, subvert or reject fixed form. The course aims to develop students’ reflective relationship to formalism in their personal poetics, even if they choose to write free verse. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 813CA or ENGL 465CA.*

ENGL 815AF - Utopian Literature
Study of a number of works significant in the utopian tradition, with attention to Historical and cultural context; themes such as politics, education, the arts, and gender roles; literary features of the genre; and related issues such as the intentional community and city planning. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 815AF or ENGL 475AF.*

ENGL 815AI - Science Fiction Adaptation
The class examines science fiction novel-to-film adaptations in the light of recent adaptation theory. It begins with classic scientific romances by H.G. Wells and then moves to recent adaptations including 2001: A Space Odyssey (Clarke/Kubrick), Solaris (Lem/Tarkovsky), and Blade Runner (Dick/Scott). *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 815AI or ENGL 475AI.*

ENGL 815AN - Special Studies in Genre: Screening the Text: Modes of Fidelity in Film Adaptation+
This is a genre course focusing on the film adaptations of a variety of source texts. It will review contemporary adaptation theory, note its links to the classic problems of literary interpretation, and pursue a critical discourse based on modes of fidelity and infidelity in the text. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 815AN or ENGL 475AN.*

ENGL 815AO - Indigenous Science Fiction and Speculative Storytelling
This course examines Indigenous science fiction and speculative storytelling as an emerging genre. Beginning with its origins in oral traditions and ending with contemporary short fiction and film, this course asks what makes Indigenous science fiction distinct from Western science fiction, as well as historical fiction about Indigenous peoples. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 815AO or ENGL 475AV.*

ENGL 815AP - Experimental Memoir
This course introduces students to the creative non-fiction memoir and personal, lyric essay. It is a hybrid course; both academic and creative writing students can enroll. There is no workshop component. Students must submit a formal academic essay. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 815AP, ENGL 475AL, ENGL 475CL, or ENGL 815CP.*

ENGL 815AQ - Women's Memoir: Theory and Practice
This seminar examines the genre of women's memoir through both a critical and creative lens. We analyze several contemporary women's memoirs while gaining practice in the craft of memoir writing. Feminist and gender theory enables us to understand as well as trouble categories such as woman, identity, memory, and narration.

ENGL 815AZ - The Making of Modern Fantasy: 1700 - 1950
This course studies the shifts in fantasy literature as both genre and mode from the 18th century, when it emerges as a recognizable genre, to The Lord of the Rings, the keystone text of modern fantasy. It takes up, also, the shifts and changes in the theory of fantasy, from 19th century considerations of the novel and the romance to Todorov , Shippey, Clute, Mendelsohn, and Attebery. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 815AZ or ENGL 475AZ.*

ENGL 815BA - Mourning and Memorial in North American Literature
Focusing primarily on the period post-1950, this course examines how the literary culture of North America responds to literary traditions of mourning and memorializing in a period that poses serious challenges to the efficacy of remembrance. Theoretical and literary works form the focus of the readings. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 815BA or ENGL 475BA.*

ENGL 815CP - Creative Writing: Experimental Memoir
This course introduces students to the creative non-fiction memoir and personal, lyric essay. It is a hybrid course; both academic and creative writing students can enroll. There is no workshop component. Creative writing students must submit a personal, lyric essay. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 815CP, ENGL 815AP, ENGL 475AL, or ENGL 475CL.*

ENGL 815CQ - CW: Women's Memoir: Theory and Practice
This seminar examines the genre of women's memoir through both a critical and creative lens. We analyze several contemporary women's memoirs while practicing and workshopping the craft of memoir writing. Feminist and gender theory enables us to understand as well as trouble categories such as woman, identity, memory, and narration.

ENGL 817AD - After Theory:Politics & Theory
Theory and practice often become the opposition between theory and politics where theory is reproached for not being sufficiently political. This course looks at the political relevance or efficacy of theory. It examines the reasons for theoretical resistance, and studies the emergence of Cultural Studies. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 817AD or ENGL 480AD.*

ENGL 817AF - “The Age of Poets”: Philosophy and Poetry in the Twentieth Century
This course examines Heidegger’s proposition that “The thinker says Being. The poet names the holy.” Our focus is on Heidegger and Hölderlin, then turns to Jacques Derrida and Paul Celan. We will conclude with Alain Badiou’s pronouncement that the “Age of Poets,” Heidegger’s “suture” of philosophy to poetry, is over.

ENGL 817AG - Literary Theory: Ethics and Zombies
Embodying contemporary anxieties of apocalyptic disaster, zombies summon fundamental ethical questions. This course examines the zombie in literature, film, the graphic novel, and the TV series The Walking Dead through the lens of bio-ethical theory and philosophers such as Kant, Nietzsche, Jonas, Arendt, and Levinas. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 817AG or ENGL 417AG.*

ENGL 817AH - Rhetoric of Apology in Canada
This course examines the rhetoric of government apologies in Canada as national mythologies or narratives of forgiving and forgetting government policies that defined, “who belongs and who does not belong to the nation.” We will examine ideological underpinnings of apologies and attempts at reconciliation through Canadian tragedies. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 817AH or ENGL 480AH.*

ENGL 817AI - Literary & Environmental Ethics: Ecocriticism, Ecology, Ecotechnics
This course examines two Canadian novels and three philosophers to ask, What is an environmental ethics? How does nature relate to the concept of environment, world, or creation? We investigate the concept of nature, guided by economic, technological, scientific, or religious thinking, to rethink humanity's dominion over plants and animals. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 480AI or ENGL 817AI.*

ENGL 820AB - Postcolonial Literature/Theory
An examination of writing in English from former British colonies in the Pacific, Africa, Caribbean, South Asia, and Canada. We will study such current debates as universality and difference, representation and resistance, nationalism, hybridity, feminism, and language. Students will lead the discussion by presenting seminars on a variety of topics.

ENGL 820AD - American First Nation Fiction
A study of key narratives of N. Scott Momday, James Welch and Leslie Silko, three of the most accomplished and influential contemporary First Nations writers in the USA.

ENGL 820AP - Eighteenth Century Sexualities
This seminar will explore issues of gender and sexuality in Eighteenth Century culture, including literature, artwork, music, and fashion. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 820AP or ENGL 420AP.*

ENGL 820AT - Canadian Aboriginal Literature
This course examines what makes Indigenous literature distinct within the context of Canadian culture and history by exploring a variety of Canadian Indigenous story telling forms: oral traditions, fiction, drama, and film on a range of topics including post colonialism, relations to land, spiritual traditions, popular culture, identity, and empowerment. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 820AT or ENGL 445AT.

ENGL 820AU - Fantasy Literature
This seminar will examine the development of fantasy literature, from its early medieval roots to the work of contemporary writers such as Guy Gavriel Kay. Students will trace connections between the chivalric tradition and contemporary fantasy, while reading critical materials on the genre. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 820AU or ENGL 475AU.*

ENGL 820AV - You Are Here: The Power of Place in Creative Writing
This seminar explores the significance of place and world-building in creative writing. Whether you're describing a fantastic city, or simply one's own room, the imaginative language of place is vital Through a series of workshops on both fiction and creative non-fiction, this class will converse about the landscape of writing. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 820AV or ENGL 485AV.*

ENGL 820AW - Ekphrasis: Theory & Practice
This class discusses the theory of ekphrasis, examines a series of ekphrastic texts, and gives students practice in ekphrastic writing. The bulk of the class is devoted to student workshops in which their ekphrastic writing - poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, or scholarly analysis - will be analyzed by the class. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 820AW or ENGL 485AW.*

ENGL 820AY - Histories of Childhood
This course examines childhood as a historical concept, a literary representation, and a media phenomenon. We’ll look at experiences of Medieval children, examine Shakespeare’s treatment of adolescence (along with queer/non-traditional adaptations), the development of children’s literature during the 19C, & a variety of children’s/YA texts that engage with ecology and dystopia. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 820AY or ENGL 475AY.*

ENGL 820AZ - Literature and the Anthropocene
Numerous scientists, philosophers and artists believe that humans have recently entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, an epoch that is defined by the ways that human civilization has fundamentally altered the Earth. *This class is a hybrid class, meaning that it can be taken for academic or creative writing credit.*

ENGL 820BA - CW: Writing Genre
This graduate-level creative writing seminar will focus on popular genres, including fantasy/science-fiction, detective fiction, horror, YA literatures, and digital genres. Students will workshop their own creative texts while also reading criticism on genre studies and the craft of writing.

ENGL 820CU - Creative Writing: Writing Fantasy
This course will focus on writing fantasy in a number of forms. We’ll tackle the epic to the postmodern, and discuss the inner workings of the genre-fiction industry. Along the way, we’ll read works of literary/popular fantasy across historical periods. Students will submit a final portfolio with a critical introduction. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 820CU or ENGL 475CU.*

ENGL 820CW - CW: Ekphrasis: Theory & Practice
*Creative Writing Section* This class discusses the theory of ekphrasis, examines a series of ekphrastic texts, and gives students practice in ekphrastic writing. The bulk of the class is devoted to student workshops in which their ekphrastic writing - poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, or scholarly analysis - will be analyzed by the class. *Note: Students may receive credit for one of ENGL 820CW, ENGL 820AW, ENGL 475AZ, or ENGL 475CZ.*

ENGL 820CZ - CW: Literature and the Anthropocene
Numerous scientists, philosophers and artists believe that humans have recently entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, an epoch that is defined by the ways that human civilization has fundamentally altered the Earth. This class is a hybrid class, meaning that it can be taken for academic or creative writing credit. This is the creative writing section.

ENGL 840CU - Creative Writing Directed Reading Study
Directed study on creative writing with focus on genre fiction.

ENGL 901 - Research
Permission of the Department Head is required for registration in this course.

ENGL 902 - Project Research
This course requires students to conduct research for a designated project in the first semester and then to write the project in a subsequent semester. Students are required to give a public presentation upon completion of the project. Permission of the Department Head is required for registration in this course.