Notice: Information and plans for upcoming academic terms. Learn more.

Jesse Archibald-Barber

Professor (First Nations University of Canada)
BA (Victoria), MA, PhD (Toronto)

Office: FNUniv 3001
E-mail: jbarber@firstnationsuniversity.ca
Phone: 790-5950 ext. 3155

Research interests
Saskatchewan Indigenous literatures, Indigenous theatre and performance, Cree language and literature, Indigenous science fiction.

Jesse Archibald-Barber is from oskana kâ-asastêki. He teaches Indigenous Literatures in English at the First Nations University of Canada, specializing in Saskatchewan Indigenous literary history and early Indigenous literatures in Canada.


Selected Publications

Co-Editor, Performing Turtle Island: Indigenous Theatre on the World Stage. U of Regina Press, 2019.

Editor, kisiskâciwan: Indigenous Voices from Where the River Flows Swiftly. U of Regina Press, 2018.

“Performing the Bingo Game in Tomson Highway’s The Rez Sisters.” Performing Turtle Island: Indigenous Theatre on the World Stage. U of Regina Press, 2019.

“A Poetics of Place and Apocalypse: Conflict and Contradiction in Poetry of the Red River and Northwest Resistances.” Indigenous Poetics. Ed. Neal Mcleod. Wilfred Laurier Press, 2013.

“Under Other Skies: Colonial Conflict and Reconciliation in E. Pauline Johnson’s Nature Lyrics and Memorial Odes.” Canadian Literature and Cultural Memory. Eds. Sugars and Ty. Oxford UP, 2013.

“The Elegiac Loss of the English Canadian Self and the End of the Romantic Identification with the Aboriginal Other in Leonard Cohen’s Beautiful Losers.” Selves and Subjectivities: Reflections on Canadian Arts and Culture. Eds. Manijeh Mannani and Veronica Thompson. Edmonton: Athabasca UP, 2012.

“Trick of the Aesthetic Apocalypse: Ethics of Loss and Restoration in Thomas King’s Truth and Bright Water.” Canadian Journal of Native Studies 29 1&2 (2009): 237-255.

“Cognitive Quickenings: Contemporary Readings of Orality and Literacy in English Canadian Colonial Practices and Modern Critical Theories.” International Journal of Canadian Studies 30 (2004): 101-120.