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Saskatchewan Centre for Cyclotron Sciences: A New Multi-User $CAN25 Million Research and Production Facility

Fri., Mar. 17, 2017 3:30 p.m. - Fri., Mar. 17, 2017 4:30 p.m.

Location: CL 126

AbstractThe Saskatchewan Centre for Cyclotron Sciences located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, has been commissioned and has started its activities. This new multi-user $CAN25 million research and production facility, operated by the Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation, has an interdisciplinary focus to develop and produce different radioisotopes for pre- clinical and clinical nuclear imaging using its high-current ACSI TR24 cyclotron. The facility is outfitted with state-of-the-art cGMP production clean rooms, QC laboratories, packaging rooms, and research hot labs, facilitating innovative radiopharmaceutical research and development. The facility’s research wing, currently under development, is already equipped with an animal housing room and a microPET/SPECT/CT scanner for imaging small animals. A pre-clinical study in mice has already been carried out. An advanced phytoPET scanner for plant imaging is also under development. The facility holds a Drug Establishment Licence with Health Canada and provides a daily supply of 18F-FDG to the Saskatoon Health Region. Given the projected growth and interest in this strategically situated facility, the Fedoruk Centre looks forward to supporting a wide range of cutting-edge research projects involving radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear imaging. 

SpeakerDr. Ghislain Boudreault became the Facility Manager at the Saskatchewan Centre for Cyclotron Sciences, operated by the Fedoruk Centre, in September 2016 after gaining 20 years of experience with work related to particle accelerators and production of radioisotopes. He obtained his PhD in Applied Nuclear Physics, in the field of Ion Beam Analysis, in 2002 from Surrey University (UK). After 2 years as a Research Fellow at Vrije Universiteit (The Netherlands), he became the Chief-Substitute Cyclotron Physicist at the PET Centre at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital (Denmark). In 2012 he joined the industry, becoming the R&D Cyclotron and Radionuclide Production Specialist at PMB, part of the Alcen Group (France), and occupying functions such as Project Leader and Site Manager for commissioning superconducting cyclotrons on client sites. He has worked with various particle accelerators, including electrostatic accelerators (Van de Graaff, Pelletron, Tendetron) and cyclotrons (conventional and superconducting) from 6 different manufacturers. He has gained a great deal of experience in the production of and research on many different radionuclides (18F, 11C, 13N, 15O, 81Kr, 111Cd, 211At, 68Ga) using proton, deuteron, and alpha beam on solid, liquid, and gas targets. Non-destructive ion beam analysis (RBS, ERDA, NRA, and PIXE) and experiments on heavy ion collisions add to his practical knowledge.