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Sociologist to discuss social integration of older adults at the Centre on Aging and Health Twelfth Annual Distinguished Lecture

News Release Release Date: January 21, 2015 3:00 p.m.

Dr. Neena Chappell, renowned sociologist, will be speaking at the Centre on Aging and Health’s Twelfth Annual Distinguished Lecture on Wednesday, January 21 starting at 6:00 p.m. in room 527, Administration-Humanities Building.

In her lecture, “Integration of Older Adults in Society: Is It Really Beneficial?”, Dr. Chappell will discuss social integration for older adults in terms of connection and participation, empowerment, and community. She will relate these concepts to individual participation as well as to broader concerns in society.

Dr. Chappell is Canada Research Chair in Social Gerontology at the University of Victoria. Her interest lies in the demonstration of the value and relevance of sociological thought and research for applied issues in aging. She believes rigorous university-based social science research has a critical role to play in the non-university community. She researches caregiving as well as Canadian and cross-national health and social policy.

Dr. Chappell has established two world-class university research centres on aging: University of Manitoba and University of Victoria. She has published over 250 academic articles and reports, and has brought in over $45 million in research funding. She is past president of the Canadian Association on Gerontology and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, as well as of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences.

The Centre on Aging and Health is a research centre at the University of Regina. Researchers affiliated with the Centre are looking into a wide variety of issues relating to aging and health. Centre research includes, but is not limited to, investigations of better ways of assessing and managing pain in older persons, culturally-sensitive, end-of-life care for Aboriginal persons, falls, the psychological impact of waiting lists and ethical issues in aging and health. Previous lectures have covered topics as diverse as driving in old age, pain management in older adults, technologies to helps older adults live healthier and safer lives, the health of North American immigrants, strategies for preventing falls in older adults, behavioural health in late life and others.

For more information about the Centre on Aging and Health: www2.uregina.ca/cah/.

 

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