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Diploma Programs

Computer Science

Computing affects virtually everything. Industries, organizations, and activities are facilitated and enhanced by computing. Many big decisions in the world today are already being made by computers, from what appears on your social media feed, to what stocks get bought and sold, to self-driving cars and speech recognition phones. If you understand computing, you will be able to elevate your career to a higher level.

The University of Regina’s Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science Honours degrees in Computer Science are accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Council (CSAC). The Department of Computer Science was one of the first four departments in Canada to be accredited in 1982. We are the only computer science department in Canada to have been accredited continuously since then.

Our expansive computer science program offers two diplomas in addition to our seven bachelor’s degree programs and graduate degree programs:

Diploma in Computer Science

This two-year program (60 credit hours) is designed for professionals seeking to upgrade in areas related to computer science. Courses are offered at times convenient to off-campus students, as well as in the traditional day slots.

Completing the diploma takes two years, on average. If you already have a university degree, completion may take only one year.

Post-Diploma Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

This program is available to graduates of the two-year diploma programs in Computer Systems Technology and Computer Information Systems from Saskatchewan Polytechnic. It is an opportunity to obtain a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Regina. To be eligible, you must have completed the diploma within the last 10 years. Graduates of other diploma programs in these areas may also be considered for admission.

What is Computer Science?

Computer science is the study of computers and computing, including their theoretical and algorithmic foundations, hardware and software, and their uses for processing information.

Areas of study within computer science include artificial intelligence, computer systems and networks, information security, database systems, human computer interaction, graphics, numerical analysis, programming languages, software engineering, bioinformatics and theory of computing.

Some sample courses in computer science at the U of R include:

Web and Database Programming 

Web and Database Programming shows how interactive database-driven web applications are designed and implemented. Appropriate protocols and languages for web and database programming are discussed, with a focus on client-server architectures, interface design, graphics and visualization, event-driven programming, information management, data modeling, and database systems.

Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Introduction to Artificial Intelligence explores the foundations and main methods of Artificial Intelligence. Topics include: problem characteristics and spaces, search and optimization techniques with a focus on uninformed and heuristic algorithms, and two player games, to name a few. 

Introduction to Data Science

Introduction to Data Science introduces data science, including current programming languages and libraries for performing data analysis. Topics cover data exploration and preparation, data visualization and presentation, computing with data, and an introduction to data modeling and predictive analysis.

Human Computer Communications

Human Computer Communications demonstrates the importance of good interfaces and the relationship of user interface design to human-computer interaction. Other topics include interface quality and methods of evaluation, interface design examples, dimensions of interface variability, dialogue genre, and dialogue tools and techniques, to name a few; user-centered design and task analysis; prototyping and the iterative design cycle; user interface implementation; prototyping tools and environments; I/O devices; basic computer graphics; and colour and sound.

Virtual and Augmented Reality

Virtual and Augmented Reality examines the design and implementation of software in virtual and augmented reality environments. Topics range from development practices to assets and avatars.

Quick Facts

Program: Diploma in Computer Science Post-Diploma Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
Length: 2 years
Accreditation: Computer Science Accreditation Council (CSAC)
Offered Through: University of Regina

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Computer Science Meet Your Faculty

Why Study Computer Science at the University of Regina?

Every organization has data, and computer scientists are the data wranglers. Artificial intelligence, algorithm analysis, information security, human interaction with computing systems, and video games are all growing fields with applications in every aspect of life.

Salaries are very competitive in the tech sector, in part due to skills shortages. There are far more computing jobs than grads to fill them, and starting salaries reflect this.

The U of R’s computer science programs are interdisciplinary. We partner with other units on campus to develop new and innovative research programs. We are able to quickly adapt to emerging technologies in computing.

Many of our professors are recognized both nationally and internationally, and are dedicated to providing our students a high-quality education.

The belief in the ability to invent, discover, and innovate is what pushed me to enroll in Computer Science at the University of Regina. The CS program has provided me with the means to learn the basis of artificial intelligence. I learned in depth about natural language processing, machine learning, problem solving, and reasoning. My goal is to utilize all the information, experimentations and learning I have done in the program to contribute to research in AI and robotics.

Sana Shareef Kadiwal
4th Year Student (Bachelor of Science)

Computer Science Diploma Frequently Asked Questions

What’s the difference between the Diploma in Computer Science and the Post-Diploma Bachelor of Science in Computer Science?

The Diploma in Computer Science is designed for professionals who want to upgrade in areas related to computer science. It is not intended to be a replacement for a Saskatchewan Polytechnic diploma.

The Post-Diploma Bachelor of Science in Computer Science is available to graduates of the two-year diploma programs in Computer Systems Technology and Computer Information Systems from Saskatchewan Polytechnic.

What are the admission requirements?

To register for the Diploma in Computer Science, you must meet the requirements for admission to the Faculty of Science.

For the Post-Diploma Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, you must have previously completed a two-year diploma in Computer Systems Technology or Computer Information Systems from Saskatchewan Polytechnic. To be eligible, you need to have completed the diploma within the last 10 years with a minimum 70 per cent graduating average and a passing grade in Math C30 or equivalent. Graduates of other diploma programs in these subject areas may also be considered for admission.

What can you do with a Computer Science diploma?

Upon successfully completing your diploma in computer science, you will be ready for an industry computing career. Our graduates have gone on to jobs such as:

  • IT Network analyst
  • IT Security analyst
  • Software developer