Undergraduate Courses

JS 090 - Justice Studies Orientation
This compulsory pass/fail course orients and prepares students for success in Justice and Undergraduate Studies: this will build upon the foundations provided by the Faculty of Arts orientation. It will assist students with information on Justice Studies programs, practica and career opportunities in the justice field. Professionals from various justice organizations will provide information about career opportunities. *Note: This is a zero-credit, three-hour required course and is offered one time during the Fall and Winter semesters. This is not a 13-week course. Students must take this course prior to applying for the JS 290 practicum field experience or prior to completing 30 credit hours.* *Note: JS 100 is required for all majors in Justice Studies programs.*

JS 100 - Introduction to Justice
Introduces major theoretical orientations and methods of justice studies. Provides an overview of the Canadian legal system and issues involved in the pursuit of criminal, legal, restorative, and social justice. *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 201 and JS 210. Students may receive credit for only one of JS 100, 210 or HJ 201.*

JS 230 - Introduction to Canadian Law
Examines the conceptual foundations, structure and administration of law in Canada, including criminal and civil law. Current legal debates and precedent setting cases will be discussed. ***Prerequisites: Completion of 12 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 307. Students may receive credit for only one of JS 230 or HJ 307*

JS 240 - The Criminal Justice System
An introductory analysis of the criminal justice system. An examination of the Canadian criminal justice process from initial police involvement through court processes to the correctional disposition of convicted offenders. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 310 and JS 340. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 310, JS 240 or 340*

JS 276 - Professional Ethics
Philosophical consideration of ethical problems which arise in the context of the conduct of professional practice. Areas include ethics of privacy and confidentiality with applications to justice. ***Prerequisites: Completion of 12 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Notes: Students may receive credit for only one of PHIL 276 or JS 276. JS 276 is only offered to JS students when PHIL 276 is not scheduled in neither a Fall or a Winter semester*

JS 280 - Introduction to Social Justice
An interdisciplinary examination of the nature and foundations of social justice, including human rights. Theoretical and applied perspectives are included. ***Prerequisites: Completion of 12 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered JS 380 and HJ 309. Students may receive credit for only one of JS 280, JS 380 or HJ 309*

JS 290 - Practicum I (Introductory): Field Placement
JS 290 is an introduction to professional practice in an approved human service or justice organization. The goal of the practicum is to provide students with the opportunity to integrate theory in practice by applying the knowledge, skills and abilities acquired during their academic study. ***Prerequisite: 30 credit hours, including JS 090, JS 100, JS 291 and 65% PGPA and 60% UGPA or permission of department head.*** *Note: Students must fill out the required forms for off-campus activities. *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 202. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 202 or JS 290.* *Note: Students must complete this course between their 30th and 90th credit hour.*

JS 291 - Professional Communications and Writing
This course explores professional communication and writing practices in a justice context. Case study examples will be used to instruct students on various communication strategies. Students will develop their professional writing and reporting competencies within a justice framework. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 203. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 203 or JS 291*

JS 313 - Mental Health and Substance Abuse
Mental health and substance use/abuse are significant issues for justice organizations and professionals and clients. This course will explore approaches to prevention, intervention and suppression. Public policy related to both areas will be examined. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 354. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 354 or JS 313*

JS 316 - Mediation and Dispute Resolution
Examines the role, purposes, use of mediation and other methods of conflict or dispute resolution. Assesses appropriate use of a variety of dispute resolution mechanisms, especially as they relate to issues of race, class, and gender. Emphasis on conflict resolution in the context of human justice and restorative justice. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100 and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** * Note: Formerly numbered HJ 321 and HJ 381AC. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 321 or 381AC or JS 316. *

JS 317 - Justice, Democracy and Social Change
Examines justice in terms of concepts and practices of citizenship within democratic societies. Examines political justice, representations, governmental obligations re: human services and the growing role of non-governmental organizations. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100 and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 314. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 314 or JS 317*

JS 318 - Restorative and Community Justice
This course will examine, in depth, the restorative justice paradigm and its applications. The development of justice alternatives to criminalizing approaches will be explored. The concepts and services and emerging roles for the community and victims will be analyzed. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJS 320, 322, 433 and 384AC. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 320, 322, 433, 384AC or JS 318*

JS 319 - Criminological Theories
This course examines various theories within the discipline of criminology that attempt to explain and predict the etiology and epidemiology of criminal and deviant behaviour in Canadian society. Both classical and contemporary theories of crime are considered. Multiple theoretical and disciplinary perspectives may be discussed. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** * Note: Student can only receive credit for JS 498AE or JS 319 *

JS 331 - Family Law and Family Policy
Examines legislation, policies, institutions, and processes relevant to family welfare. Considers issues such as child protection and the structure and operation of family courts. Includes comparisons with other jurisdictions. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 60 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 423. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 423 or JS 331*

JS 332 - Law and Society
This course explores law as a social institution. It examines the origin, impact and definition of law, dispute resolution, and the relationship between law and social change. It seeks to engage students in a critical examination of law from a theoretical foundation by applying theory to Canadian law. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head***

JS 341 - Policing in a Democratic Society
Explores the roles, organization, and accountability of policing within democratic societies. Considers implications of jurisdiction, geography, community, training and operations. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 315. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 315 or JS 341*

JS 342 - Best Practices in Correctional Programs
Analyses innovative practices in services for offenders in both institutional and community-based correctional settings. Topics include assessment of offender risk, shaping positive cognitive and social behaviours, overcoming substance abuse, and the protection and promotion of health. Research evidence on the efficacy of such programs is examined. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 60 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 480AK. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 480AK or JS 342*

JS 343 - Community Policing
A theoretical examination of the history and models of contemporary community policing in Canada. The interrelated roles of the community and the police in the development and implementation of community- and problem-oriented policing in urban as well as rural settings will be examined. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head***

JS 350 - Justice and Indigenous Peoples
Intended to help human service workers understand the background of current issues, including aboriginal rights, land claims and self-government. Explores aboriginal history, colonization, settlement, displacement, and constitutional issues here and abroad. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100 and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 332. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 332 or JS 350*

JS 351 - Forms of Racism in Canadian Society
This course examines the socio-historic system of racism with a focus on the Canadian Aboriginal experience. Manifestations of the different forms of racism are explored. Participants engage in a variety of activities to analyze racism and evaluate their beliefs and actions in order to promote equity and anti-racism practice. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100 and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 306. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 306 or JS 351*

JS 370 - Young Offenders and Youth Justice
Examines the status and prospects of youth and current legislation in regard to young offenders. Compares current and former legislation, with attention to guiding principles and actual outcomes. Considers policy and service issues and their impact on youth and youth workers. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100 and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 330. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 330 or JS 370*

JS 381 - Foundations of Human Rights
Examines the historical, political, and legal development of human rights and how gender, class, and various aspects of personal and collective identity affect our understanding and realization of human rights. Emphasizes the interrelationships of civil and political rights with social and economic rights. ***Prerequisites: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head. JS 230 and JS 280 are recommended.*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 312. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 312, JS 381, or IS 490AD* *Note: Recommended for those wishing to take JS 481*

JS 383 - Social Justice Movements
Examines the theories, meanings and practices of social justice movements in Canada and internationally. Examines local, national, and international social movements and the ways in which economic globalization has led to the formation of the anti-globalization movement. Analyzes the strategies and forms of resistance used by social movements to effect social, economic, political and religious change. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 353. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 353, JS480, or JS 383.*

JS 390 - Case Management
Case management is used by professionals from many disciplines including justice professionals. It is a map that guides to integrate their existing knowledge, expertise, and values in more meaningful ways towards improving the quality of services. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head***

JS 391 - Interprofessional Collaboration
In this course students will explore complex issues related to health, social well-being, justice and learning in an interprofessional context. Primary goals will be to engage students in opportunities which develop knowledge, skills and attitudes related to collaborative competencies, promote interprofessional learning and to foster interprofessional practice. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered JS 380AK and HJ 380AK. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 380AK, JS 380AK or JS 391. *

JS 392 - Crime Intelligence and Analysis
This course introduces students and professionals to the role of intelligence and analysis in policing. Students and professionals will obtain the knowledge, skills and tools for basic analysis techniques. The course provides insight into the principles of intelligence led policing, critical thinking, and analysis. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered JS 398AB. Students may receive credit for only one of JS 392 or JS 398AB*

JS 412 - Environment and Justice
Traces environmental movements, environmental ethics, evolution of environmental assessment/protection, criminalization of pollution, and international environmental agreements. Approached from several perspectives: deep ecology, social ecology, green politics, sustainable development, bio-regionalism and eco-feminism. ***Prerequisites: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head***

JS 415 - Program Evaluation
Introduction to organizational, methodological and professional issues involved in evaluating programs in government and non-government organizations that deal with justice issues. This course offers a practical understanding of the evaluation process, including identification of key evaluation questions, program logics, measurement, research design, and qualitative evaluation. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credit hours and any 300-level JS course or permission of Department Head***

JS 418 - Advanced Seminar in Law and Restorative Justice
This course will focus on special topics in the area of law or restorative justice. The intent is to offer a special focus on key and contemporary issues in the field and allow students to explore that topic in great depth throughout the semester. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credit hours and any 300-level JS course or permission of the Department Head***

JS 419 - Advanced Seminar in Criminal Justice
This course will focus on special topics in the area of criminal justice systems. The intent is to offer a special focus on key and contemporary issues in the field and allow students to explore that topic in great depth throughout the semester. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credit hours and any 300-level JS course or permission of Department Head***

JS 431 - International Law and Justice
Explores the role of law, courst and policy at the international level in the pursuit of criminal justice and social justice. Examines how advocacy and service organizations use these international mechanisms in pursuit of justice-related goals. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credit hours and any 300-level JS course or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 424. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 424 or JS 431*

JS 440 - Advanced Issues in Corrections and Community Justice
Examines shifting assumptions and changing practices in dealing with persons found guilty of criminal offences, as they pertain to both institutional and community settings. Topics include programming models, tensions among retributive, rehabilitative, and restorative approaches, and the role of culture and communities in repairing harm done by criminal behaviour. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credit hours and any 300-level JS course or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 384AB and HJ 407. Students may receive credit for one of JS 440, HJ 407 or HJ 384AB*

JS 443 - Police Organization, Administration & Leadership in Canada
This course focuses on the principles of administration, organizational behaviour and leadership in human services agencies, including social and criminal justice agencies. Topics include financial and human resource management, implementation of programs toward fulfillment of objectives and decision-making. This course will also examine different models and styles of organizational structure and how they influence organizational behaviour. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credit hours and any 300-level JS course or permission of Department Head***

JS 460 - Discrimination and Justice
This course examines the social, economic, political and legal implications of discrimination based on: age, ethnicity, racial, gender, sexuality, ability and religion. The course assesses possible areas for social justice advocacy alongside potential legal/judicial remedies to ensure rights and self-determination. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credit hours and any 300-level JS course or permission of Department Head***

JS 481 - Advanced Issues in Human Rights
This course focuses on special topics in the area of social justice and human rights. The focus is on key and contemporary issues in the field allowing students to explore that topic in great depth throughout the semester. ***Prerequisites: JS 100, any 300-level JS class and completion of 60 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 426. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 426 or JS 481*

JS 484 - Community Advocacy and Public Policy
Explores general approaches and practical skills that can be used in working to achieve justice-related goals, including policy analysis, political advocacy, organizational and community-based activism, public education, and community development. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, and completion of 30 credit hours or permission of Department Head*** *Note: Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 405, JS 384, or JS 484 *

JS 490 - Practicum ll (Advanced): Field Placement
The Advanced Practicum field placement focuses students’ attention on personal and professional development: clarifying values, developing self-confidence and self-reliance, and problem-solving actual life experiences. ***Prerequisites: JS 090, JS 100, 290, 291, Completion of 90 credit hours, 65% PGPA and 60% UGPA.*** **Permission of the Practicum Coordinator is required to register** *Note: Students must fill out the required forms for off-campus activities* *Note: Formerly numbered HJ 445. Students may receive credit for only one of HJ 445 or JS 490*

JS 492 - Major Project
Students build on the Field Placement and Seminar components of the Advanced Practicum through the preparation of a substantial research paper, which is also the basis of an oral presentation to other students and faculty members. ***Prerequisite: JS 090, JS 100, 290, 291, Completion of 90 credit hours, 65% PGPA and 60% UGPA***

JS 494 - Practicum: Professional Training and Paper
Students will undergo the final stage of their training. This will involve a four month period of work with an approved sponsoring police service and completion of an assigned paper. *** Prerequisite - Completion of a term at an approved Police College or equivalent training with an approved police service, admission to the BA in Police Studies, a minimum of 60% PGPA and 65% major GPA *** **Permission of the Police Studies Coordinator is required to register ** * Note: JS 494 is a compulsory course for students who were enrolled in pre-police studies at any time before finding employment with a police service, and for officers who have less than five years service upon application for admission to the BA in Police Studies.* *Note: Students may not receive credit for both JS 494 and 495.* *Note: Formerly numbered PLST 448. Students may receive credit for only one of PLST 448 or JS 494.*

JS 495 - Practicum: Paper
Students must complete an assigned paper which will integrate academic learning with contemporary policing. *** Prerequisite - Completion of 75 credit hours of pre-police studies (including 15 credit hours of transfer credit for police college (or equivalent)training), admission to the BA in Police Studies, a minimum of 60% PGPA and 65% major GPA. *** **Permission of the Police Studies Coordinator is required to register ** * Note: JS 495 is intended for officers with at least five years of service upon application for admission to the BA in Police Studies, and who were not enrolled in pre-police studies before finding employment with a police service.* *Note: Students may not receive credit for both JS 494 and 495.* *Note: Formerly numbered PLST 449. Students may receive credit for only one of PLST 449 or JS 495.*

JS 498AI - Advanced Seminar in Social Justice
This course will focus on special topics in the area of social justice and human rights. The intent is to offer a special focus on a key issues in the field and allow students to explore that topic in great depth throughout the semester including community-based research practices. ***Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credit hours and any 300-level JS course or permission of Department Head***

JS 499AC - Research Techniques in Justice Studies
This class will focus on qualitative methods and research design. Students will learn about the distinction in methodological approaches and will undertake a small scale project that includes all elements of writing a research proposal. ***Prerequisite: JS 210, 290/291, 340, 380 and completion of 60 credit hours, or permission of Department Head***

JS 499AD - Restorative and Transitional Justice
This course examines restorative justice theory and practice in the context of transitional justice in post-conflict situations. ***Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credit hours and any 300-level JS course.*** *Note: JS 318 is strongly recommended.*

JS 800 - Research Design in JS
The course critically examines issues and techniques relating to quantitative and qualitative social science research as it is related to police and justice studies. The course uses the case method as well as seminar and lecture formats.

JS 801 - Theoretical Perspectives
An examination of the nature and foundations of justice in its various renderings, such as justice as retribution, desert, righteousness, equality, procedural fairness, and restoration of harmony and balance. The course draws upon religious thought, philosophy, legal concepts, economic and social theory, and Aboriginal cultures and teachings.

JS 802 - Interprofessional Collaboration in Community Safety and Justice
In this course students will explore, in an interprofessional context, complex issues related to justice, health and learning. A primary objective will be to engage in opportunities to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes related to collaborative competencies and promote interprofessional learning to foster interprofessional practices among policing and security services (RCMP, municipal police services, CBSA, etc.), health and educational organizations: first responders, fire fighters, social workers, hospitals, etc.

JS 803 - Public Safety and Community Policing
This course is a theoretical examination of the history and models of contemprary community policing in Canada. The interelated roles of the community and the police in the development and implementation of community and problem-oriented policing in urban as well as rural settings will be examined.

JS 804 - Public Safety in a Democratic Society
This course considers the role, organization, and accountability of policing within democratic societies; considers implications of jurisdiction, geography, community, training and operations.

JS 805 - Graduate Research Seminar
Students will undertake research on topics relating to justice and present the results to fellow students and interested faculty.

JS 810 - Crime and Society
The course examines the social processes involved in the definition and measurement of crime. Students critically examine alternate theoretical explanations of these processes and issues in the conflict of law. The course uses the case method as well as seminar and lecture formats.

JS 820 - Contemporary Issues in Justice and the Law
This course will provide students with a brief historical review of justice and an in-depth examination of the major contemporary justice issues.

JS 880AA - Quantitative Methods
National Summer Institute (NSI) for Statistical & GIS Analysis of Crime and Justice Data. Sponsored by SSHRCC and Statistics Canada.

JS 880AB - Soc.Movements/Devel.Countries
This course will examine local and national social movements of the most marginalized to better understand how economic globalization led to the formation of the anti-globalization movement. Analyzes the strategies and forms of resistance used by social movements in efforts to effect social, economic and political change.

JS 880AC - Accommodation of Minority Communities in the Canadian State
Explores both the theory of minority collective rights and the accomodation mechanisms that have been adopted in Canada with respect to minority communities. This examination will consider the political values of fairness, stability, human well-being and governmental efficacy.

JS 880AD - Contemporary Issues in Policing
This course focuses on issues in contemporary Canadian policing including the internal and external forces that are shaping police practices. A number of theories of police organizations are introduced and they provide a framework to better understand the behaviour of police organizations in the present, as well as how they will impact the futures of policing.

JS 880AE - Crime Intelligence Analysis
This course introduces students and professionals to the role of intelligence and analysis in policing. Students and professionals will obtain the knowledge, skills and tools for basic analysis techniques. The course provides insight into the principles of intelligence led policing, critical thinking, and analysis.

JS 880AF - Advanced Seminar in Social Justice
This course will focus on special topics in the area of social justice and human rights. The intent is to offer a special focus on a key issues in the field and allow students to explore that topic in great depth throughout the semester including community-based research practices.

JS 880AG - Practicum
JS 880AG is an introduction to professional practice in a human service or justice-related organization. The practicum provides students with the opportunity to integrate theory into practice by applying the knowledge, skills, and abilities they gained in academic study in a professional setting.

JS 890AA - Penology and Corrections
Critical analysis of the history, social context, and forms of oppression in penology and corrections, and how different theoretical approaches can help explain assumptions and practises in this field. Recent theoretical reformulations and innovative service models, and their potential ideological and practical impacts on the field, will also be examined.

JS 890AB - Security and Justice
Advanced consideration of issues related to economic and redistributive justice, including the neo-liberal dismantling of welfare state programs, polarization of the labour market into "good" and "bad" jobs, definitions of work, and new approaches to redistribution such as the basic income model.

JS 890AC - Law and the Social Sciences
Examines the way that research as well as theoretical models from the social sciences are integrated within the law. Specific attention will be paid to how "social science" impacts the law. The course will be presented through an analysis of relevant US and Canadian case-law.

JS 890AD - Indigenous Perspectives on Law & Justice
Examines Indigenous perspectives on "justice", including criminal, restorative and social justice. Concepts, categories, practices and administration of law in Indigenous cultures are also analyzed, including the degree of congruence and difference of these ideas with those of prevailing Western paradigms. The role of the institutions of law and justice in colonialism and oppression of Indigenous peoples is discussed.

JS 890AE - The Globalization of Agriculture
This graduate level course is divided into two sections. It begins by analyzing the history and processes involved in the globalization of an industrial and neo-liberal model of agriculture and the impact this has had on the environment and rural communities worldwide. Next, it will explore alternative views of rural development and assess the viability of local sustainable food systems.

JS 890AF - Advanced feminism, women and globalization
An examination of conditions of women's lives in global context. Engages feminist theoretics in postcolonialism, anti-racism locations, and examines women's issues including poverty, labour and power, sexual exploitation etc. and feminist responses from various geo-political locations.

JS 890AG - Globus Intensive Summer Course - Social Justice and Human Rights
A in-depth consideration of a range of topics related to social justice and human rights in the Canadian, European and international contexts. Considers both theoretical and applied aspects.

JS 890AH - Social Justice Movements in Developing Countries
Examines local and national social movements of the most marginalized to better understand how economic globalization has led to the formation of the anti-globalization movement. Analyzes the strategies and forms of resistance used by social movements to effect social, economic and political change.

JS 890AI - Soc. Science & Policing
This course will focus on an examination of Social Science research, theories & models as they relate to policing. Topics include eye witness, interviewing, interrogation & professionalization.

JS 890AJ - Research Topics on Juvenile Prostitution
This graduate level course is divided into three sections. The first section will involve the student addressing specific research methods associated with social science research. The second will involve an examination of a variety of statistical techniques. The final section will address the historical and current research into juvenile prostitution.

JS 890AK - Domestic Violence, Structures & Assessment
This graduate level course is an in-depth consideration of a range of topics related to domestic violence including socio-legal analysis, research methods and theory.

JS 890AL - Discourse Analysis and Sex Tourism
This graduate level course is divided into three sections. It begins by exploring the academic literature on tourism, sex and travel-writing. Next, it will examine the links between globalization and sex trafficking. Finally, the course ends with readings on discourse analysis. The course will run from July 16 - October 31, 2007.

JS 890AM - Accountability in Economic Social and Cultural Rights
This graduate level course will explore various aspects of developing accountability mechanisms to ensure the realization of economic, social and cultural rights. The material will cover experiences in various parts of the world.

JS 890AN - Police Attitudes and Practices
This course will examine mainstream and Aboriginal perceptions of police and police conduct. Literature perceptions of police and police and conduct. Literature will be reviewed on vicarious and personal experiences of interaction with police. Focus on conflict theory and its application to this issue and an exploration of other relevant theories will be followed by a study of particular research methods applicable to this study.

JS 890AO - Globus Intensive Summer Course II - Social Justice and Human Rights
A in-depth consideration of a range of topics related to social justice and human rights in the Canadian, European and international contexts. Considers both theoretical and applied aspects.

JS 890AP - Advanced Issues in Corrections
Analyzes forms of intervention, programming models, and professional practices in services for offenders in both institutional and community-based correctional settings. Topics include assessment of offender risk, shaping positive cognitive and social behaviors, overcoming substance abuse, and the protection and promotion of health.

JS 890AQ - Selected Topics in Conflict Resolution Studies: Globus Social Justice Institute
This two-week summer institute, will provide students with a wide range of provocative lectures and seminars on current social justice, restorative justice and human rights issues, taught by academic leaders from member faculties from the European and Canadian universities participating in the Globus Social Justice consortium. Students will have the opportunity to creatively engage with professors and other students both in the classroom and through off-site activites designed to foster dialogue and relationships as well as stimulate learning.

JS 890AR - Juvenile Delinquency & Gangs
his course explores a number of theoretical and practical issues relating to the study of juvenile delinquency and gang formation. Additional emphasis is placed on Aboriginal youth gangs.

JS 890AS - Qualitative Research Methods in Justice Studies
This course focuses on the theory and methods of qualitative research with an emphasis on criminological research . Throughout this course students will critically analyze and apply a number of qualitative research methods (observation, ethnography, case studies, narrative analysis, and individual and group interviewing) in a safe learning environment.

JS 890AT - Social Movements: Resistance and Social Change
Social movements are key actors in shaping social, economic and political change. This course explores the theories and practices of social movements, collective action and resistance. Historical and current case studies of class and identity-based local, national and transnational movements will be explored.

JS 890AU - Eritrea's Development Model
This course will critically analyze the specific development approach adopted by Eritrea. This entails gaining an understanding of how the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) conflicts with participatory, rights-based and alternative models of development. Challenges to implementing a model of development based on self-reliance will also be explored.

JS 890AV - Restorative Justice: Theory, Application and Evaluation
This course explores the theoretical foundations, the practical applications and program evaluation in the area of restorative justice. Additional emphasis is placed on restorative justice practices in Saskatchewan.

JS 890AW - Urban Theory and Social Justice
This course will explore key concepts and research in urban theory. The student will investigate notions of social justice from a cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary perspective.

JS 890AX - Aboriginal Justice Issues in Canada
This course examines an array of Aboriginal justice issues in Canada. Topics covered include: the history and impact of the residential school system and the resulting truth and reconciliation commission, the Gladue court rulings, the over-representation of Aboriginal Peoples in the criminal justice system, and restorative justice alternatives.

JS 890BB - Historical Perspectives on Community Corrections in Canada
This course provides a historical analysis of the people, events, and social conditions that gave rise to the development of community corrections in Canada, with an emphasis on Saskatchewan. Student(s) will be introduced to historiography, including the tensions between history and oral history, to gain an understanding of the short- and long-term policy and program developments in community corrections.

JS 890BC - Directed Reading: Domestic Violence and Trauma
This course will be a directed reading in which the student will become more familiar with key concepts and research in the area of domestic violence and trauma. The readings will include a mix of scholarly and practitioner based readings and willl be a multi-disciplinary perspective.

JS 890BD - Transitional and Restorative Justice in the Balkans
This course examines the conflict in the former Yugoslavia and the justice mechanisms employed to address the aftermath. Topics include: an examination of the conflict, as well as transitional and restorative justice theory and practice.

JS 890BE - Aboriginal Policing Models and Justice Issues
This course examines policing in the context of Aboriginal communities. It explores the history, issues, and various models employed in Canada. It also examines the relationship between various justice paradigms and Aboriginal worldviews. Finally, it explores methodological considerations concerning conducting research in this area.

JS 890BF - Truth and Reconciliation in Canada
The course guides students through a comprehensive examination of colonialism in Canada in relation to the issues examined in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's work and its 94 Calls to Action. Work includes literature research as well as community work with reconciliation projects within the province.

JS 901 - Research
Thesis Research.