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Interdisciplinary Programs

Contents

Advanced Manufacturing and Process Systems (AMPS)
(Until further notice, FGSR is not accepting applications for this program)

Graduate Coordinator: Gordon Huang, PhD

Program Description

The Advanced Manufacturing and Process Systems (AMPS) program adopts an inter-disciplinary approach to the training of highly qualified specialists from a multiplicity of backgrounds who intend to work in the fast-advancing manufacturing and process industries. Graduates of the AMPS program will bring their different backgrounds in engineering, computer science, and administration to bear in developing solutions for the many problems facing the manufacturing and process industries in their drive toward better control of their operations through improved technology and innovative management techniques.

The Faculty of Engineering at the University of Regina is the administrative home for the AMPS program. Students enrolled in AMPS will receive a Master of Applied Science degree from the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research. Accordingly, AMPS students must meet the admissions standards of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research and for the Master’s graduate programs in Engineering. The thesis research topic will be inter-disciplinary in nature and a minimum of two co-supervisors, one from the Faculty of Engineering and another, from either the Faculty of Administration or the Faculty of Science, will supervise the student.

The AMPS program consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours of course work and 15 credit hours of thesis research. All students must take AMPS 900, a 3 credit hour seminar course, six additional credit hours of courses must be taken from the Faculty of Engineering’s course offerings. Six additional credit hours of courses must be taken from the Faculty of Administration’s or from the participating departments of the Faculty of Science’s course offerings. The remaining 3 credit hours of course work may be taken from those courses offered by the Faculty of Administration, the Faculty of Engineering, or the Faculty of Science. The Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research must approve each student’s program.

Admission

Students seeking admission to the AMPS program must provide a research proposal outlining the interdisciplinary nature of the research and the proposed courses for their program. In this regard, applicants are encouraged to consult with the coordinator prior to making a formal application. Subsequent changes to the proposed courses and thesis research must be approved by the AMPS Steering Committee and the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research. The completed application (all materials for a regular MASc, a memo from the co-supervisors indicating their willingness to supervise, plus the research proposal and list of proposed courses) must be submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research. The application would subsequently require the approval of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, before a formal offer of admission will be sent to the applicant.

Course Descriptions

AMPS 880AA-ZZ Selected Topics (Variable 1-3)
Selected topics in Advanced Manufacturing and Process Systems.
Prerequisite: Permission of Coordinator.

AMPS 900 Seminar Course (3)

AMPS 901 Thesis Research (Variable 1-15)
Thesis research.

Cross-Listed Courses

All 800 level courses offered in the Faculty of Business Administration, Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Science, and 400 level courses in these Faculties may be considered as eligible courses, subject to the approval of the student’s supervisory committee Committee. A maximum of one 400 level course may be taken by AMPS students during the course of their program. For detailed descriptions of available courses, see the appropriate Faculty/Department headings.


Gerontology

Graduate Coordinator: Abgail Wickson-Griffiths, PhD

Faculty Listing

Program Description

The Centre on Aging and Health coordinates an interdisciplinary research-oriented Master's degree in Gerontology. Students may work toward an MA or an MSc degree depending on the nature of their Master's thesis research. This program reflects the collaboration of the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, and the Faculty of Social Work. The program aims to provide research training and specialized gerontological knowledge to health professionals. The program is also suitable for students who wish to pursue doctoral studies and research careers.

Admission Requirements

A 4-year undergraduate degree in kinesiology, psychology, social work, nursing, biology; or a health professional degree. Some courses (e.g., GERO 890) have undergraduate prerequisites. Students who have not completed these prerequisites or equivalent can still be admitted to the program with the understanding that they will be expected to complete these undergraduate prerequisites prior to being able to complete the corresponding gerontology program courses.

Degree Requirements

Primary Courses* 15 credit hours
Secondary Courses**   3 credit hours
Thesis Research 12 credit hours
Total 30 credit hours

* Primary Required Courses include KHS 892/GERO 890 or MNUR 820/GERO 893, KHS 803 or PSYCH 801, PSYC 802, one of SW 816/GERO 816 or SW 803/GERO 803, one of JSGS 817, EC&I 809, ECON 865, PSYC 823, or SW 881. Students who have taken KHS 892/GERO 890 may take MNUR 820/GERO 893 in lieu of one of JSGS 817, EC&I 809, ECON 865, PSYC 823, or SW 881.  Students who have taken MNUR 820/GERO 893 may take KHS 892/GERO 890 in lieu of one of JSGS 817, EC&I 809, ECON 865, PSCY 823, or SW 881.

** Secondary Courses include KHS 866 or PSYC 807, students may also substitute KHS 866 or PSYC 807 with a directed readings course on ethical issues (e.g. PSYC 890 or KHS 877). Such an arrangement would require approval from the CAH Graduate Programs Committee.

The Centre on Aging and Health will coordinate a series of presentations (by both gerontology program faculty and external speakers). Students will be expected to complete 10 presentation attendance/participation credits before they graduate.

Course Descriptions

EC&I 809: Program Evaluation (3)
The course is directed to individuals charged with designing and/or conducting evaluation activities, those who commission and use the results of evaluation studies, and those who are the subject of evaluations and wish to better understand the evaluation issues and activities in which they are involved.

ECON 865: Health Economics and Policy (3)
The course considers issues such as benefit coverage, compensation of healthcare providers, user fees, pharmaceuticals, regional health boards, and comparative health policy.

GERO 800 Gerontology Seminars (0)
The course involves a series of seminars (or related public events) on a variety of topics related to gerontology.  These seminars are normally coordinated by the Centre on Aging and Health.  Approximately five seminars or related public events are offered per calendar year.

GERO 803 End-of-Life Issues for Human Service Workers (3)
This course deals with the impact of end-of-life issues on people, their families and social work and health care practitioners. The role of the social worker in practice, research, education and policy in end-of-life care will be explored.
Note: Crosslisted with SW 803

GERO 816 Aging, Society and Human Service Work (3)
This course considers social work practice, research, education and policy with seniors in the community and in institutions. The focus of the course will be the role of the social work perspective in each of these professional activities with seniors.
Note: Crosslisted with SW 816

GERO 890 Physiology of Aging (3)
An advanced study of the alteration in physiological function associated with the normal aging of body systems and the clinical consequences of these changes for maintenance of optimal function, physical activity, health and longevity.
Note: Crosslisted with KHS 892

GERO 893 Patterns of Health and Illness in the Elderly (3)
Advanced practice nurses will be prepared with a strong theoretical foundation in health promotion, illness prevention and maintenance of health across populations and communities.  Interprofessional approaches to improve population health considering the influence of sociopolitical, environmental, economic and health concepts are included. 
Note: Crosslisted with MNUR 820

GERO 901 Thesis Research (Variable credit 3-15)
Thesis research.

JSGS 817: Health Policy (3)
The course will review the historical development of the Canadian health care system and its supporting principles, governance structures and fiscal arrangements; and examine contemporary structures and relationships. Issues such as benefit coverage, health human resources, user fees, pharmaceuticals, regional health boards, and health reform in a comparative context will be examined.

KHS 803: Research Design and Methods in Kinesiology and Applied Health Sciences (3)
This course explores health research issues and provides an examination of the technical aspects of planning and performing research in kinesiology and applied health sciences. Topics include: critical evaluation; success in writing research proposals and grants; research ethics; data collection and management strategies; and communicating and publishing research successfully.

KHS 866: Ethical Decision Making in Kinesiology and Health Care Administration (3)
This course investigates the content, process, and the moderators of ethical decision making in the administrative context of Kinesiology and Health Studies. Students will be exposed to ethical, cultural, and administrative theory as a means to use and develop decision models to resolve administrative dilemmas.

PSYC 801: Research Design and Methodology in Psychology (3)
A critical examination of issues involved in the planning, conducting, and evaluation of research in psychology with emphasis on clinically-relevant areas.

PSYC 802: Applied Multivariate Statistics (3)
This course consists of a survey of multivariate research methods in psychology. Topics may include: Multiple regression, ANOVA and ANCOVA using MR, discriminant analysis, MANOVA, profile analysis, principal components and factor analysis, structural equation modelling and path analysis, time series.

PSYC 807:  Research and Applied Ethics (3)
This course will provide an intensive examination of ethical issues in research, teaching, and applied fields of psychological study.

PSYC 823: Programme Development and Evaluation (3)
This course is an advanced seminar on approaches and techniques relevant to the development and evaluation of mental health programs.

SW 881: Qualitative and Applied Research Methods (3)
This course is designed to develop a thorough knowledge and range of skills in the research methodologies of qualitative, applied, and participatory research and action research for use in social work practice situations. The course will review the foundations of qualitative research and their relevance to social work practice-based and knowledge building research.


Interdisciplinary Studies in MAP

Associate Dean, Graduate & Research: Kathleen Irwin, PhD

Graduate Program Coordinator: Christine Ramsay, PhD

Faculty Listing:  http://www.uregina.ca/finearts/areas-study/inter-studies/faculty-staff/index.html

Program Description
The graduate programs in Interdisciplinary Studies in MAP include a studies-based Master of Arts (MA); a practice-based Master of Fine Arts (MFA); and an Interdisciplinary PhD in Media and Artistic Research with three possible paths: Path A: Research on the Arts; Path B: Research in the Arts; and Path C: Research Through the Arts.  In all cases, students are required to complete projects which integrate knowledge from two or three distinct traditional disciplines, one of which must be a MAP discipline (i.e.: film, media production, media studies, music, theatre, visual arts) or area (i.e.: creative technologies).

It is the philosophy of our program that traditional skills and specializations are usefully augmented and contextualized by a more traditional fine arts perspective and a contemporary cross-disciplinary approach. As society moves towards information economies, cultural and entertainment sectors are rapidly emerging as driving forces in change. In this environment, there is an opportunity to expand beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries to the areas of creative technologies and science; social history; pedagogy; and consciousness and identity. The graduate program in Interdisciplinary Studies in MAP is designed to accommodate students who are motivated to pursue innovative projects in a rigorous intellectual environment that is supported by a flexible framework of coursework and an expansive network of research links to the university community.

Faculty Description
The Faculty of MAP consists of the Departments of Film, Music, Theatre, and Visual Arts, and the Creative Technologies area. It is affiliated with the Department of Interdisciplinary Programs at the First Nations University of Canada. MAP offers a variety of undergraduate degrees as well as MA degrees in Interdisciplinary Studies, Media Studies, Musicology, and Music Theory; MFA degrees in Interdisciplinary Studies, Media Production, and Visual Arts; MMus degrees in Performance, Composition, and Conducting; and an Interdisciplinary PhD in Media and Artistic Research.

MAP explores contemporary media, art and performance practices, their histories and theories, in innovative and imaginative ways. Graduate programs offer core theoretical seminars, intensive hands on practices, and diverse courses taught by experienced faculty to facilitate individualized study programs. Research projects led by instructors provide training opportunities and funding. Support is also available through Graduate Studies Scholarships, Teaching Assistantships, and Graduate Student Assistantships. Our funded research initiatives include the Interactive Media and Performance (IMP) Labs, Regina Improvisation Studies Centre (RISC), and the Voice Lab. We host the program Artists-in-Residence in Socially Engaged Practice, in which visiting artists interact with students to develop professional skills and networks. Our Creative Technology Makerspace is a vibrant lab for community interaction. Regina is home to several public galleries, artist run centres, private galleries, screening facilities, and exhibition and performance spaces—many of which can provide graduate level professional placements.

Facilities and Resources
The Faculty of MAP is located in the state-of-the art Riddell Centre (Interdisciplinary Studies, Music, Theatre, Visual Arts), and in the Education Building (Film).

Film: The Department of Film teaches film and digital media in an interdisciplinary environment, preparing students to realize their paths as film and media artists, critics, historians, educators, curators and craftspeople. At the graduate level we offer the MFA in Media Production and the MA in Media Studies, taught by faculty actively engaged in scholarly and creative projects. Graduates have gone on to award winning careers across Canada and internationally. They work as independent filmmakers and producers, directors, screenwriters, editors, and cinematographers in series television and on national and international fiction, documentary and animation productions. Our graduates have careers as festival programmers, researchers, archivists and educators. Film has 4K and HD video cameras, 16mm film cameras, a production studio, digital editing suites, audio post-production facilities, a photography darkroom, and a 3-D scanner and Maya animation workstations. Resources in the City of Regina include the Saskatchewan Filmpool Cooperative and the annual Saskatchewan Independent Film Awards (SIFA).

Interdisciplinary Studies: New technologies, markets, and research methodologies require inventive approaches that respond to individual circumstances. Combining community and social engagement with diverse arts practices, Indigenous arts with curatorial theory, media studies with electronic music, performance-based practice with visual arts, bringing together creative technologies, or exploring new directions in culture and display in institutional settings—these are some of the ways our Interdisciplinary Studies graduates have formulated thesis-based or practice-based graduate projects into new careers. Interdisciplinary Studies collaborates with other faculty members from across the University in our Interdisciplinary Studies PhD, MFA and MA programs, and students have access to shared studio space and the full range of MAP facilities.

Music: Opportunities for master's-level study in music include: 1) Traditionally oriented programs: the MMus with concentration in one of Performance, Conducting or Composition and the MA in the areas of Musicology or Music Theory; and 2) The Interdisciplinary MFA, in which music research may combine two or more of: creative technologies; music composition for multimedia; musicology; socially engaged performance practice; improvisation; and interdisciplinary approaches to solo performance or conducting. Resources in the City of Regina include the Regina Symphony Orchestra, Darke Hall, and various music series.

Theatre: The Theatre Department offers students the opportunity to work with experienced professionals in two state-of-the-art theatres, movement and rehearsal studios, design and CAD labs, and costume and carpentry shops. Students who have graduated with MFA degrees have explored directing, playwriting and dramaturgy, going on to achieve professional careers in their fields. We also participate actively in graduating students through Special Case MFAs and the Interdisciplinary Studies program where students have, for example, investigated playwriting; walking performance; critical costume and gender identity; scenography; installation and performance; queer performativity; disability theatre; theatre and business administration; and conducting and design. Resources in the City of Regina include the Globe Theatre and its Sandbox Series, and Curtain Razors.

Visual Arts: Each graduate student in the Department of Visual Arts is provided with a generous studio space, guaranteed for six semesters and use of a fully equipped wood shop, computer lab and extensive equipment in each of the studio areas: ceramics, drawing, painting, print media, photography, and sculpture. Specialized equipment includes a 36" slab roller, 11" diameter hydraulic extruder, two clay mixers and 3 gas kilns (one car kiln), complete photo-etching, litho and etching areas, wordpress, photomechanical and digital area, ortho camera and photo litho area, paper making and bronze casting facilities, welding and wood shop areas, digital video cameras, Mac computers, still cameras, monitors and other electronic media. The Dr. John Archer Library houses more than 30,000 Visual Arts volumes and numerous periodicals. The Visual Resource Centre has approximately 100,000 slides plus videotapes, video/disks, other audio-visual materials and a growing digital database. The City of Regina has public galleries: the MacKenzie Art Gallery, the Dunlop Art Gallery, the Art Gallery of Regina, Neutral Ground Artist Run Centre, and Skêwêwak Artists’ First Nations Collective as well as commercial galleries.

Library: The Dr. John Archer Library houses the University of Regina’s entire collections of books, journals, government documents and microforms, comprising 832,000 monographs, pamphlets and periodicals, 585,000 government publication and 913,000 other items in microform. The Archer provides seating for 760 readers and there are 170 computer workstations with printing access and full office productivity software for student use on its main floor. It contains listening facilities, recordings, microfilms, and a broad spectrum of scores, collected works and music texts. Library services and collections support the research and information needs of students at the undergraduate and graduate levels, faculty and the community-at-large. The library's collection is comprised of resources in traditional and electronic formats, including print micro format, audio-visual and multimedia, CD ROM and electronic full-text. Electronic resources are accessible at networked workstations across campus. The Library provides course reserve services, on-site listening facilities, photocopiers, microreaders/printers, laser disk players, and other specialized equipment required to use audio-visual and multimedia resources.

City of Regina: Other resources available in the City of Regina include the Saskatchewan Legislative Library, which holds unique photo-archives and historical sub-collections; the Gabriel Dumont Institute of Metis Studies and Applied Research; La Cite Universitaire Francophone; as well as other research centres and public archives.

Entrance Requirements and Application
Students entering the Master of Arts program must hold a four-year undergraduate degree from an accredited university or a similar recognized qualification from a comparable institution. Students entering the Master of Fine Arts program should in most cases hold a Bachelor of Fine Arts or a Bachelor of Music. Qualified applicants will be considered for admission to the program on the basis of academic standing and a proposal leading to an MA thesis or an MFA project. This proposal must clearly demonstrate the need for supervision in more than one area of knowledge and must indicate the availability of resources and supervision in these areas. In addition to the proposed program, applicants should submit appropriate supporting material (portfolio, sample of scholarly writing, etc.) and a proposed format for their graduation project. An audition and/or interview may be required. Once students have begun course work a more detailed, formal proposal will be submitted to the supervisors and IDS Graduate Committee for approval.

What to include in a proposal for an MA or MFA in Interdisciplinary Studies:

  1. Nature and Proposed Title of the Research Program and/or Thesis Project
    State clearly what degree you wish to obtain (MA or MFA).
  2. Proposed Areas of Research
    Outline the areas of research and investigation (and proposed subject areas) you wish to address in your program of study and what your goals are.  What questions do you wish your program of study to address?  If you have determined a thesis or project topic, briefly outline it here.
  3. Background/Rationale
    Situate your proposed program of study in relation to Fine Arts practices/concepts/theories. If you have begun research, indicate its extent.
  4. Statement on Interdisciplinarity
    State clearly the interdisciplinary nature of your program of study and justify the need to be supervised in more than one department. State succinctly why you wish to do an MA or MFA in Interdisciplinary Studies.  Define what aspects of your training and background make you a suitable candidate for this program.
  5. Departments from which Supervision will be Required
    Most projects will require supervision from two departments or one department an an area. Occasionally supervision from a third department might be considered.
  6. Supervisors
    List proposed supervisors as well as their department affiliation. Note their academic strengths and what expertise they will bring to the thesis or project. State if you have contacted these faculty members.
  7. Examples of your work in support of the application All forms of digital and analog materials will be considered, including writing and published materials.  A sample of written work that demonstrates critical thinking must be included, for example, an artist's statement or an upper level undergraduate essay.

Residence Requirements
The student must be in residence for at least two consecutive semesters for the MA, and four consecutive semesters for the MFA, and all work toward the degree must be completed within five years. The workload of interdisciplinary degrees is typically heavier than in other graduate programs, and such programs frequently take longer than two years.*

Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Interdisciplinary Studies

This is a professional, practice-based program requiring 42 credit hours of graduate work

FA 800 3
FA 803 3
FA 804 or FILM 804 3
One of:
  FA 899
  ART 801-804
3
Elective 3
Courses related to two major areas of research 12
FA 902 15
FA 903 (Optional) 0
Total Credit Hours
42

Note:*In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of the Associate Dean (Graduate & Research), Faculty of MAP, and FGSR, a maximum of 3 credit hours of senior undergraduate courses (300-400 level) in a discipline of direct relevance to the student’s proposed program of study may be taken.

Graduation Requirements
All the regulations of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research apply. Students are required to: a) Present an exhibition, production, or performance in a professional manner in a university or alternative urban arts space approved by the supervisors; b) Prepare a written engagement paper (a support document of approximately 40 pages, not including bibliography); and c) Complete and pass an oral examination on the exhibition, production, or performance.

Student progress will be reviewed each year at the end of Winter semester by the supervisors and the IDS Graduate Committee.

In keeping with the regulations of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, the panel to examine the exhibition/production/performance of a Master of Fine Arts candidate will consist of the co-supervisors, the external examiner, two other members of the Faculty of MAP, and a Chair of Defense from outside the Faculty of MAP.

Master of Arts (MA) in Interdisciplinary Studies

This is a studies-based program requiring 30 credit hours

FA 800 3
FA 803 3
Courses in identified disciplinary areas 6
One of:
  FA 804
  FILM 804
  FA 899
3
FA 901 15
Total Credit Hours
30

Note:*In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of the Associate Dean (Graduate & Research), Faculty of MAP, and FGSR, a maximum of 3 credit hours of senior undergraduate courses (300-400 level) in a discipline of direct relevance to the student’s proposed program of study may be taken.

Graduation Requirements
All the regulations of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research apply. Students are required to present a thesis on an approved topic (approximately 60-100 pages, not including bibliography) and complete and pass an oral examination on the thesis. In keeping with the regulations of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, the panel to examine the thesis of a Master of Arts candidate will consist of the supervisor or co-supervisors, the external examiner, one or two other members of the Faculty of MAP, and a Chair of Defense from outside the Faculty of MAP.

Interdisciplinary PhD in Media and Artistic Research
(effective 201930)

Entrance Requirements and Application
The MAP Interdisciplinary PhD program in Media and Artistic Research aims to equip students with advanced research skills and extensive knowledge in a specialized area of research-creation and/or scholarship. The target audience for the program is primarily students who have completed their MFA and/or MA education and have a strong interest in a research-focused career in the arts and/or education with a clear understanding of the relationship between artistic research, artistic practice and reflection.

The program provides an opportunity to expand the role of arts-based research to include, for example, areas of technology and science; social history; pedagogy; Indigenous and non-Indigenous consciousness and identity; and curation. It encourages students to consider innovative research questions that investigate new terrain beyond the traditional disciplinary boundaries by combining multiple theoretical and methodological frames, or to focus on research that addresses the scope and bounds of one discrete discipline. 

The MAP Interdisciplinary PhD program is also aligned with the University of Regina Strategic Plan 2015- 2020, peyak aski kikawinaw: Together We Are Stronger, as a catalyst for generating meaningful scholarly experience and research with impact based in our collective focus as treaty people on shared values, a wide vision for the future, and collaboration. To join this doctoral program means developing an artistic research project or thesis of high quality that is expected to contribute to the development of new knowledge and deepen and/or challenge existing practices within the artistic field—enjoying equal status with other forms of academic research that communicate together in a peer context. The doctoral candidate will work in an interdisciplinary environment where focus is on artistic processes/outcomes and reflection on their significance to their larger cultural, social and political contexts.

The degree has three possible paths:

  1. Path A: Research on the Arts: Course/thesis-based investigations aimed at drawing valid conclusions about art practice from contemporary theoretical
  2. Path B: Research in the Arts: Multi-modal research based in course and practice-based applied research. A written thesis is not required although another means of critical reflection must be agreed upon with the supervisory committee and in 
  3. Path C: Research through the Arts: Course/practicthesis-based investigations in which the artistic practice itself is an essential component of both the research process and the research results.

Students entering the PhD program must hold an MA or MFA from a recognized institution. Qualified applicants will be considered for admission to the program on the basis of academic standing and a proposal leading to a thesis (Path A), research-creation project (Path B), or hybrid research-creation/thesis project (Path C). The proposal must clearly demonstrate the need for supervision in more than one area of knowledge and must indicate the availability of resources and supervision in these areas. In addition to the proposal, applicants should submit appropriate supporting material (portfolio, sample of scholarly writing, etc.) and a proposed format for their graduation project. An audition and/or interview may be required. Once students have begun course work a more detailed, formal proposal will be submitted to the supervisors and IDS Graduate Committee for approval.

What to include in a proposal for an Interdisciplinary PhD in Media and Artistic Research

  1. Nature and Proposed Title of the Research Program and/or Thesis Project
    State clearly what degree you wish to obtain (PhD Path A, Path B, or Path C).
  2. Proposed Areas of Research
    Outline the areas of research and investigation (and proposed subject areas) you wish to address in your program of study and what your goals are.  What questions do you wish your program of study to address?  If you have determined a thesis project topic, briefly outline it here.
  3. Background/Rationale
    Situate your proposed program of study in relation to fine arts practices/concepts/theories. If you have begun research, indicate its extent.
  4. Statement on Interdisciplinarity
    State clearly the interdisciplinary nature of your program of study and justify the need to be supervised in more than one department. State succinctly why you wish to do a PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies.  Define what aspects of your training and background make you a suitable candidate for this program.
  5. Departments from which Supervision will be Required
    Most projects will require supervision from two departments, or one department and an area. Occasionally supervision from a third department might be considered.
  6. Supervisors
    List proposed supervisors as well as their department affiliation. Note their academic strengths and what expertise they will bring to the thesis or project. State if you have contacted these faculty members.
  7. Examples of your work in support of the application
    All forms of digital and analog materials will be considered, as well as written and published materials.  A sample of written work that demonstrates critical thinking must be included, for example, an artist's statement or graduate level essay.

 

Courses

Cr Hrs

FA 800 Seminar in Theory and Methods l 

3

FA 803 Seminar in Theory and Methods II

3

FA 804 Studies in Media, ART, and Performance or

FILM 804 Critical Investigations in Film

3

FA 805 Interdisciplinary Doctoral Symposium

3

FA 900 Comps (or studio equivalent)

0

Approved Graduate Electives (studio or theory)*

18

Thesis or Final Project:

FA 901 (thesis) or FA 902 (studio)

30

Total

60

*Approved Electives:
ART 820AA-ZZ, ART 830AA-ZZ, ART 840AA-ZZ, ART 850AA-ZZ, ART 860AA-ZZ, ART 870AA-ZZ, ART 884AA-ZZ, ART 890AA-ZZ, ART 880AB, ART 881, ART 881AA, ART 890AE
FA 801, FA 810AD, FA 870AA, FA 890AO, FA 890AZ, FA 890BA, FA 890BB, FA 890BC, FA 890BD, FA 890BE, FA 899
FILM 804, FILM 810AA, FILM 810AB, FILM 810AC, FILM 810AD, FILM 810AE, FILM 810AF, FILM 810AG, FILM 810AH, FILM 810AI, FILM 810AJ, FILM 810AK, FILM 810AL, FILM 810AM FILM 810AN
FILM 810AO, FILM 810AP, FILM 810AT, FILM 820AN, FILM 831AS, FILM 890AA, FILM 890AB, FILM 890AC, FILM 890AD, FILM 890AO
MU 809AI, MU 817
SOST 880AM
THEA 810AB, THEA 820AA, THEA 820AD, THEA 820AE. THEA 820AQ

Graduation Requirements
All the regulations of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research apply. Students are required to: a) Present a thesis, research-creation, or thesis/research-creation hybrid project in a professional manner in a university or alternative urban arts space approved by the supervisors; b) Prepare a written thesis or research-creation support paper, as required by the PhD path in question; c) Complete and pass an oral and/or written comprehensive examination on the project.

Student progress will be reviewed each year at the end of Fall semester by the supervisors and the IDS Graduate Committee.

In keeping with the regulations of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, the panel to examine the thesis, research-creation, or thesis/research-creation hybrid project of a PhD candidate will consist of the co-supervisors, the external examiner, two other members of the Faculty of MAP, and a Chair of Defense from outside the Faculty of MAP. Another committee member external to the university may be added where appropriate and with the approval of the supervisors and the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research.

Course Descriptions

Registration in any MAP graduate course requires the permission of the Associate Dean (Graduate & Research), MAP or the instructor of the course.  A suitable level of competency is a prerequisite for some of the courses.

FA 800 Seminar in Theory and Methods (3)
Seminar exploring and questioning the history, theory and aesthetics of Fine Arts, and the diverse and shifting conceptions of Fine Arts disciplines in relation to other social and cultural forms.

FA 802 (400AD) Seminar/Studio in Interdisciplinary Theory and Practice (3)
Seminar/studio course situating, analyzing and producing interactive media and performance. Theoretical, socio-cultural, historical and political contexts of interactive media and performance will be explored.

FA 803 Seminar in Theory and Methods II (3)
Seminar exploring diverse approaches to research in the Fine Arts, including studies-ased and practice-based methods.

FA 810AA-ZZ Selected Topics in Fine Arts (Variable credit 3-6)
Seminar course examining selected topics in the Fine Arts.

FA 880AA-ZZ Selected Topics in Fine Arts Studio (Variable credit 3-6)
This series of studio courses is designated selected topics within Fine Arts.

FA 890AA-ZZ Directed Reading in Fine Arts (Variable credit 3-6)
Directed study in Fine Arts under the supervision of a faculty member.

FA 900 Comprehensive Examination (0)
Comprehensive Exam is a requirement of all PhD students in Fine Arts.

FA 901 Thesis Research (Variable credit 1-15)
Research supporting a studies-based program resulting in the writing and defense of a graduating thesis of 60-100 pages.

FA 902 Research Project (Variable credit 1-15)
Research supporting a professional, practice-based program resulting in the writing of a comprehensive critical engagement paper of 30 - 40 pages and the preparation and public presentation of a graduating project.

FA 903 Project Report Course (0)
The student submits the final project or critical engagment paper.

ARTH 810AA-ZZ Selected Topics in Art History (Variable credit 3-6)
Seminar course examining selected topics in Art History.

ARTH 890AA-ZZ Directed Reading in Art History (Variable credit 3-6)
Directed study in Art History under the supervision of a faculty member.

FILM 810AA-ZZ Selected Topics in Film Studies (Variable credit 3-6)
Seminar course examining selected topics in Film Studies.

FILM 820AA-ZZ Selected Topics in Film Production (Variable credit 3-6)
Seminar course or project examining selected topics in Film Production.

FILM 890AA-ZZ Directed Reading in Film (Variable credit 3-6)
Directed study in Film under the supervision of a faculty member.

THEA 810AA-ZZ Selected Topics in Theatre Studies (Variable credit 3-6)
Seminar course examining selected topics in Theatre Studies.

THEA 820AA-ZZ Selected Topics in Theatre Production (Variable credit 3-6)
Seminar course or project examining selected topics in Theatre Production.

THEA 890AA-ZZ Directed Reading in Theatre (Variable credit 3-6)
Directed study in Theatre under the supervision of a faculty member.

THEA 902 – Master’s Project (1 – 18 credit hours)
Research, rehearsal and public presentation of a project.

See MAP department handbooks and Administrative Assistants for ongoing updates to the roster of courses offered in Fine Arts (FA); Media Production and Media Studies (FILM); Music (MU); Theatre (THEA); and Visual Arts (ART). This information is also housed with the Administrative Assistant in the Office of the Dean of MAP.


Social and Political Thought
***PLEASE NOTE: Admission to this program has been suspended until further notice***

Graduate Coordinator:  David Elliott, PhD

Faculty Listing:  http://www.uregina.ca/arts/philosophy-classics/programs/philosophy/sopt/Committee%20for%20Social%20and%20Political%20Thought.html

Program Description

The Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought at the University of Regina is an interdisciplinary master’s degree program anchored in the Departments of Political Science and Philosophy, with links to other departments in the humanities and social sciences. The program stresses flexibility and originality. It is directed by the Committee for Social and Political Thought, which is devoted to insuring that the program has the requisite rigor, depth, and imagination. The emphasis is on problems, issues, and concepts that lend themselves to a variety of disciplinary, critical, and theoretical approaches. The focus of the program is on ideas and their expression in historical, cultural, social, and political contexts.

Admission Requirements

Students must have an undergraduate degree in either Philosophy or Political Science with a minimum average of 75%. Students with degrees in related disciplines (e.g., Sociology, with an emphasis on social theory, or History, with an emphasis on intellectual history, or English, with an emphasis on literary theory) will also be eligible, but may be required to complete qualifying courses before full admission into the program. Candidates for admission are expected to have a clear idea of the thesis topic that they wish to pursue. The deadline for applications to receive first consideration for funding is February 15.  The final deadline for all applications to the program is March 15.

Applicants to the MA program in Social and Political Thought must submit a writing sample as part of their application package.  All work shall be original and normally reflect work in an upper-level Philosophy or Political Science course.  Submissions must be single-sided, double spaced, 12 point Times New Roman font, and should be between 10-15 pages in length (maximum 4000 words).

Master of Arts - Social and Political Thought - Thesis-based

Program Requirements

SOPT 800 3 cr hrs
SOPT 801 3 cr hrs

PSCI / PHIL or Related Discipline 8xx*

3 cr hrs
PSCI / PHIL or Related Discipline 8xx* 3 cr hrs
PSCI / PHIL or Related Discipline 8xx* 3 cr hrs
SOPT 901** 15 cr hrs
TOTAL 30 cr hrs

*Three graduate courses selected from the Departments of Political Science and Philosophy as well as from other participating departments, and approved by the Committee for Social and Political Thought.
**A thesis supervised by an accredited faculty member and approved by the Committee for Social and Political Thought

Courses in Philosophy and Political Science may include:

  • Liberalism and Freedom
  • Marxism
  • Kant’s Political Philosophy
  • Kant’s Ethical Theory in Historical Perspective
  • Hegel’s Philosophy of Right
  • Philosophy of Justice
  • Critical Theory
  • Postmodernism
  • Plato
  • Aristotle's Ethics
  • Issues of Identity in Ethics
  • Metaphysics
  • Modern Political Theory: The Continental Tradition
  • Modern Political Theory: The English Liberal Tradition
  • Philosophy and Literature
  • Contemporary Political Theory
  • Feminist Philosophy

Thesis Requirements

The thesis is to be a minimum of 60 pages and a maximum of 80 pages in length. The topic, supervisor, and committee are to be approved by the Committee for Social and Political Thought.

Committee for Social and Political Thought

The Committee for Social and Political Thought is made up of professors in Philosophy and Political Science who oversee the Program. This group includes: David Elliott (Philosophy); Tom McIntosh (Political Science); Anna Mudde (Philosophy), Robert Piercey (Philosophy), Ann Ward (Philosophy and Political Science), Lee Ward (Political Science); and Eldon Soifer (Philosophy). A complete list of participating faculty members and their research interests can be found on the Program website.

Course Descriptions

SOPT 800 Foundations in Social and Political Thought I (3)
A faculty-directed course of independent study in the foundations of political, historical and contemporary. The course will be administered by the Committee for Social and Political Thought.

SOPT 801 Foundations in Social and Political Thought II (3)
A Faculty-directed course of independent study in the foundations of political philosophy, historical and contemporary. The course will be administered by the Committee for Social and Political Thought.

SOPT 890AA-ZZ Directed Readings in Social and Political Thought (3)
Directed readings in selected topics.

SOPT 901 Thesis Research (Variable credit 3-15)