Woodrow Lloyd Lecture features Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

By Dale Johnson Posted: February 22, 2016 3:00 p.m.

Murray Sinclair will be speaking at the University of Regina on February 24 about the Indian Residential School System in Canada.
Murray Sinclair will be speaking at the University of Regina on February 24 about the Indian Residential School System in Canada. Photo courtesy of the Honourable Justice Murray Sinclair

This year’s speaker at the Woodrow Lloyd Lecture is the Honourable Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, the mandate of which is to inform Canadians about First Nations, Inuit and Métis experiences in the Indian Residential School System in Canada.

Justice Sinclair will be speaking on Wednesday, February 24, at 7:00 p.m. at the Education Auditorium. There is no charge and refreshments will be served following the lecture.

Justice Sinclair, who has been honoured with a National Aboriginal Achievement Award, was Manitoba's first Aboriginal judge and was appointed Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba in 1988.

"It is a great honour for the faculty of arts to host Justice Murray Sinclair as the 2016 Woodrow Lloyd Lecture speaker,” says Nilgün Önder, acting associate dean of arts (research and graduate) and a professor in the department of politics and international studies.

“Justice Sinclair symbolizes ‘reconciliation.’ We hope to make at least a small contribution, through organizing this lecture and associated public events, toward the realization of the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission chaired by Justice Sinclair," she adds.

“In confronting all Canadians with cold reality of our past, the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is perhaps the most important contribution to public policy and public awareness in a generation,” says James Daschuk, an associate professor in the faculty of kinesology and health studies, who will be introducing Justice Sinclair.

Daschuk received the Governor General’s Award for his bestselling book, Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life.  

“In their report, the Commissioners have challenged every Canadian to do more than recognize and accept the injustices of residential schools. They want us to do something. Their 94 calls to action have provided a road map for what we, not just governments, but we as individual citizens can do to start the healing process. If we as Canadians can rise to the challenge offered by Justice Sinclair and his colleagues, it will be a turning point in our history,” Daschuk adds.

“We are honoured to have Justice Sinclair present the Woodrow Lloyd Lecture as part of our campus community's commitment to act on the TRC Recommendations," says Michelle Stewart, director of the Community Research Unit, and associate professor in the department of justice studies, who is a member of the Woodrow Lloyd Lecture Committee.

The faculty of arts presents an annual lecture in honour of Woodrow Stanley Lloyd, Saskatchewan’s premier from 1961 to 1964 and Minister of Education from 1944 to 1960. He laid the cornerstone of the first building on the Regina Campus of the University of Saskatchewan, now the University of Regina. Each lecture features a nationally or internationally recognized scholar, writer, thinker, and/or activist, who speaks on issues of direct relevance to Saskatchewan.

This lecture will live streamed; please see the event website for details.
 
Event:          Woodrow Lloyd Lecture, the Honourable Justice Murray Sinclair

Date:           Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 7:00 p.m.

Location:     Education Auditorium, University of Regina; free parking in lots 13 and 14M