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The day when the new Regina Campus was born

By Dale Johnson Posted: September 26, 2016 6:00 a.m.

On Sept. 26, 1963, Premier Woodrow Lloyd officially marked the start of work on Regina Campus.
On Sept. 26, 1963, Premier Woodrow Lloyd officially marked the start of work on Regina Campus. Photo: U of R Archives and Special Collections, courtesy Don Webb Photography Ltd.

The new campus got its start on this date 53 years ago – on September 26, 1963 – when the cornerstone for the Classroom Building was laid by Premier Woodrow Lloyd. About 400 people were on hand for the ceremony, including students, faculty, staff, members of the university board of governors and senators, architects and contractors.

Guest speakers included Dr. J. W. T. Spinks, University of Saskatchewan president; Dr. W. A. Riddell, principal of Regina Campus; and Robert Gaudry, president of the Regina Campus Students’ Representative Council.

“Below and behind the official party, in a deep and widespread excavation, bulldozers hummed through their daily rounds – proof that the dreams of the planners will soon be realized,” the Leader-Post reported.

The day marked the culmination of planning that began in the summer of 1959, when plans were announced for a second campus in Regina to add to the facilities on College Avenue.

As Premier Lloyd put the inscribed cornerstone in place, he told the crowd that the new campus “has the chance to create its own traditions.”

A plaque commemorating the event on the west entranceway to the Classroom Building reads: “THIS STONE WAS LAID ON SEPTEMBER 26, 1963 BY PREMIER WOODROW S. LLOYD COMMEMORATING THE BEGINNING OF CONSTRUCTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN REGINA CAMPUS.

This first building contained classrooms, faculty and student offices, administrative facilities and a library. It was one of three new buildings that would emerge on the southeastern corner of Regina, when the Dominion Experimental Farm had previously been located.

The second building – the Laboratory Building – included laboratories, food services, a lounge, facilities for buildings and grounds, some offices, a bookstore and post office.

The third building included lecture theatres adjacent to the Classroom Building.

Classes were offered for the first time at these three buildings that made up the new campus less than two years later, on July 5, 1965.

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