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Engineering professor receives high honour from peers

By Dale Johnson and Costa Maragos Posted: July 8, 2016 6:00 a.m.

Paitoon (P.T.) Tontiwachwuthikul (r) accepted his Fellowship in the Canadian Academy of Engineering (CAE) from Douglas Ruth, CAE President.
Paitoon (P.T.) Tontiwachwuthikul (r) accepted his Fellowship in the Canadian Academy of Engineering (CAE) from Douglas Ruth, CAE President. Photo courtesy of CAE.

A professor in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science has been inducted as a Fellow in the Canadian Academy of Engineering (CAE).

Dr. Paitoon (P.T.) Tontiwachwuthikul was one of 43 new Fellows from across Canada honoured recently at the CAE’s annual general meeting in Winnipeg.

“We welcome the new Fellows. They are engineers of outstanding abilities,” says Douglas Ruth, President of the Canadian Academy of Engineering.

Tontiwachwuthikul, Professor of Industrial & Process Systems Engineering, has had a major impact at the U of R. He served as dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science from 1999 to 2013.

In announcing his Fellowship, the CAE stated: “Tontiwachwuthikul’s greatest achievement as a professor, researcher, and administrator has been leading the development and implementation of the University of Regina’s flagship research program in carbon capture and storage. His innovative research made the University of Regina the recognized world leader in CCS research and development and created one of the strongest research groups in the world.”

The CAE also notes that Tontiwachwuthikul has supervised over 80 students at PDF, PhD, MASc levels and has published over 300 publications in highly prestigious journals and conferences.

“In our past, Fellows of the Academy have produced major studies in the fields of education, energy and innovation,” says Ruth.

The Canadian Academy of Engineering is the national institution through which Canada’s most distinguished and experienced engineers provide strategic advice on matters of critical importance to Canada. The Academy is an independent, self-governing and non-profit organization established in 1987. Fellows of the Academy are nominated and elected by their peers, in view of their distinguished achievements and career-long service to the engineering profession. Fellows of the Academy are committed to ensuring that Canada’s engineering expertise is applied to the benefit of all Canadians.

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