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Renowned Indigenous scholar to debut new campus lecture series

By Costa Maragos Posted: November 7, 2016 6:00 a.m.

Dr. Marie Battiste is a professor in the department of educational foundations at the University of Saskatchewan. She holds graduate degrees from Harvard and Stanford and is the author of a number of books.
Dr. Marie Battiste is a professor in the department of educational foundations at the University of Saskatchewan. She holds graduate degrees from Harvard and Stanford and is the author of a number of books. Photo courtesy of the U of S.

Noted Indigenous scholar, Dr. Marie Battiste, delivers the U of R’s first “Deliberation and Debate” lecture series, November 9.

Battiste’s lecture is titled “Decolonizing and Indigenizing the Academy: Toward Cognitive Justice. The event is free and open to the public.

Battiste is Mi’kmaq from the Potlotek First Nation in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. She’s a professor in the department of educational foundations at the University of Saskatchewan. Battiste’s lecture is organized by the Office of Indigenization in what is the first of the “Deliberation and Debate” lecture series on campus.

“Dr. Battiste is the perfect person to begin this lecture series, because she has so many insights to share as we work to Indigenize our University – something that has been identified through our strategic plan as a priority for our institution and its students,” says President Dr. Vianne Timmons.  
 
The “Deliberation and Debate” lecture series will feature prominent speakers who will address important questions and foster critical and respectful debate on campus.

“We’re seeking a wide variety of lecture topics,” says Timmons. “As an educational institution, we must continue to encourage open dialogue on issues from a variety of viewpoints, both within and outside our campus community. I am looking forward to seeing this lecture series grow.”

Blair Stonechild

The lecture will be preceded by a short discussion by Dr. Blair Stonechild, Professor of Indigenous Studies at First Nations University of Canada.

In her lecture, Battiste will draw on treaties, national and international law, the work of other Indigenous scholars, and personal experiences to document the nature of Eurocentric models of education, their devastating impacts on Indigenous knowledge and peoples.

The discussion will also highlight the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action to schools and universities.

Battiste holds graduate degrees from Harvard and Stanford and has widely presented her research to organizations worldwide. She has authored numerous books including “Decolonizing Education: Nourishing the Learning Spirit.”

In 2008 she received a National Aboriginal Achievement Awards and earned the Distinguished Research Award from the University of Saskatchewan (2004-2005).
 
Event:     Decolonizing and Indigenizing the Academy: Toward Cognitive Justice
Date:      Wednesday, November 9
Time:       7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Location: Research and Innovation Centre
                Lecture Theatre Room 119
                Main Campus
                Parking for this free event will be available in Lot 16

You are encouraged to submit an idea for the next Deliberation and Debate event. If your idea is selected you will be provided with support to help organize the lecture. To submit a lecture idea for consideration please contact Dr. Stephen King at Stephen.king@uregina.ca.