Public talk to focus on Inquiry for Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls

By Costa Maragos Posted: March 16, 2018 1:00 p.m.

Judy Hughes, President of the Saskatchewan Aboriginal Women’s Circle Corporation, is the featured speaker.
Judy Hughes, President of the Saskatchewan Aboriginal Women’s Circle Corporation, is the featured speaker. Photo courtesy of Devin Richardson

The Indigenous Speaker’s Series presents A Path Forward: The National Inquiry for Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls on March 20.

The public event, held at First Nations University, features a talk by Judy Hughes, President of the Saskatchewan Aboriginal Women’s Circle Corporation.

This talk is a joint partnership between First Nations University of Canada and the University of Regina.

MMIWG Poster

“The organizers of this series set about putting this event together in early Fall, 2017,” says Dr. Emily Grafton, Executive Lead, Indigenization at the University of Regina.

“The timing, in the wake of the verdict of the Cormier trial, is pertinent as we try to make sense of what this acquittal means for the Inquiry and the many families involved in it across the nation.”

The inquiry was launched in October 2016 and has held hearings across Canada where families have shared their stories.  

Hughes will shed light on the history of colonial impact that led to the federal government striking the commission. She will also discuss the successes and challenges that have emerged since the commission was formed.

Over 1,200 Indigenous women in Canada are officially recognized as missing and/or murdered.

“When we consider the many, continued legacies of colonialism in Canada, murdered and/or missing Indigenous women and girls is a really important piece,” says Grafton. “I’m hoping this event gets us thinking about the continued existence of colonialism in our communities. I’m also eager to learn from Judy how the nation and our communities move forward in a hopeful way.”

The event will be opened by Elder Beatrice LaFramboise and will be held at First Nations University in the Multi-Purpose Room on Tuesday, March 20 at 7 p.m. This event is free and open to the public.

Related Story

"Highway of Tears" documentary paves way for more research