Making a difference in the community

By Dale Johnson Posted: July 9, 2015 6:00 a.m.

Shaddie Musleh is a Business Service Specialist with the Regina Regional Opportunities Commission.
Shaddie Musleh is a Business Service Specialist with the Regina Regional Opportunities Commission. Photo courtesy of Trevor Hopkin - U of R Photography.

Shaadie Musleh is a U of R graduate who opens the doors to people moving to Saskatchewan, as a Business Service Specialist with the Regina Regional Opportunities Commission.

“I help nominees with settlement, path finding and investment consulting,” Shaadie explains.

“I also help them make changes to their Business Performance Agreement, the agreement between the Government of Saskatchewan and the nominee who agrees to open a business in a specific sector and invest a minimum amount into the proposed business,” he adds.
   
Shaadie earned a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in Political Science with a minor in Sociology, in 2004 and a Bachelor of Business Administration in Human Resources in 2014.  
 
“My degrees were central to me getting the opportunity to work at RROC. The skills I learned in Arts, including but not limited to, critical thinking, research, and understanding complex social/political/economic theories provide the backbone to my skill set. My Business degree allowed me to continue to build on those skills while offering me the ability to specialize in Human Resources,” he says.
 
Shaadie has fond memories of his days at the U of R – and not just what he learned in the classroom.

He served as the Internal VP at the Students' Union. He was the U or R representative to the Canadian Federation of Students. He was Executive Director of the Carillon newspaper. He competed in the Inter-Collegiate Business Competition. He represented the U of R at a model United Nations in New York City.  

“The academic aspects are essential, but I also think the university offers the opportunity for anyone to really grow and mature. Specialization is important and positioning yourself for career growth is a great reason to get a post-secondary education. However, the value add of a university education is being exposed to diverging ideas, thoughts and discourses. Access to support from my professors was instrumental for me to be successful at the U of R. The smaller class sizes and a sense of community gave me a sense of belonging,” Shaadie recalls.

“In a world where we breakdown complex issues into 30 second bits, it now is more important than ever to have a well-rounded education.  From how to communicate effectively to understanding financials, there isn't a day that goes by that I don't use something I learned at the University of Regina in my career,” he says.