Magna Carta and the Making of the Modern World

By Dale Johnson Posted: September 28, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Dr. Carolyn Harris is the author of Magna Carta and its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law and Human Rights.
Dr. Carolyn Harris is the author of Magna Carta and its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law and Human Rights. Photo courtesy of Dr. Carolyn Harris

This year marks the 800th anniversy of Magna Carta – and an expert, Dr. Carolyn Harris, will be at the University on Tuesday to talk about the impact and significance Magna Carta has on our world today.

“Magna Carta remains important in modern Canada because the document contains the origins of the common law system and the constitutional monarchy. The document had a profound impact on the development of Canadian politics and law,” Harris explains.

Harris will speak as part of the Beyond the Book lecture series, which sponsored by the Dr. John Archer Library and President’s Office at the University of Regina and the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Law. She will discuss how Magna Carta remains relevant today.

“My talks on Magna Carta always spark a lively discussion. Some are interested in discussing the topic in terms of current events, while others are interested in the origins of the document and social and political change in medieval England,” she says.

Harris teaches history at the University of Toronto’s School of Continuing Studies and is the author of the book Magna Carta and its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law and Human Rights.  

And she has a personal connection to part of Saskatchewan’s history.

“My great-grand uncle Robert Leith ‘Dinny’ Hanbidge was Lieutenant-Governor of Saskatchewan from 1963 to 1970,” she says.

Before his appointment as Lieutenant-Governor, Hanbidge was Mayor of Kerrobert, then a provincial member of the Legislative Assembly, and later was a Member of Parliament.

The presentation takes place Tuesday, September 29, 2015 at 7:00  p.m. in the Library Administration Offices (LY610) on the sixth floor of the Dr. John Archer Library at the University of Regina. There is no admission and the public is invited to attend.