Academic society for sport management honours computer science professor

By Costa Maragos Posted: July 3, 2017 6:00 a.m.

Dr. Orland Hoeber (r), associate professor in computer science, received the Dr. Garth Paton Distinguished Service Award from the North American Society for Sport Management. The organization also honoured Dr. Brian Turner (l) (Ohio State University) and Dr. Ming Li (c), (Western Michigan University) with the Educator and Diversity Awards.
Dr. Orland Hoeber (r), associate professor in computer science, received the Dr. Garth Paton Distinguished Service Award from the North American Society for Sport Management. The organization also honoured Dr. Brian Turner (l) (Ohio State University) and Dr. Ming Li (c), (Western Michigan University) with the Educator and Diversity Awards. Photo courtesy of Larena Hoeber

A computer science professor at the U of R has been honoured by an international organization that promotes sport management, teaching, research, and academic study.  

Dr. Orland Hoeber, Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science, has received the Dr. Garth Paton Distinguished Service Award by the North American Society for Sport Management (NASSM).

Named for one the organization’s founding members, the Garth Paton Award is presented annually to a member who has at least 10 years of experience in the field and an ongoing record of service to NASSM.

Journal for Sport Management
Read Dr. Orland Hoeber’s latest research, published by The Journal of Sport Management.

Hoeber’s connection with this group started innocently enough. It was 2005, and the group was holding its annual conference at the U of R.

“I was asked at that time if I’d be willing to help out with the NASSM website,” recalls Hoeber who received the award June 3, 2017, at NASSM’s annual conference in Denver, Colorado. “I agreed, and have served as the organization’s Web Admin and defacto technology advisor to the executive council ever since.”

Over the last 12 years, Hoeber has helped NASSM embrace the changing technology landscape. He has managed the online membership and conference registration systems, and is actively involved in the conference abstract submission and peer review process, and the preparation of the accepted abstracts book, presentation schedule, and online archive.

Hoeber has also presented his research at NASSM conferences.

The North American Society for Sport Management promotes, stimulates and encourages study, research, scholarly writing and professional development in the areas of sport management.

At its recent conference in Denver, Colorado, delegates presented on a wide variety of sport management topics over three days, including understanding brand associations attached to university sports to assessing the impact of a new stadium on a local community.

The conference also featured U of R research presented by Larena Hoeber and Cory Kulczycki from the Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Sciences.

Orland Hoeber says NASSM has become his second academic home.

“I have learned many things about sport management as a discipline,” says Hoeber. “In addition to my core research on interactive information retrieval and information visualization, I do interdisciplinary and collaborative research on the process of innovation, the analysis of fan behavior on social media, and the development of software tools to support the analysis of qualitative data.”

Hoeber’s recent research on developing software and methods for analyzing large-scale qualitative-temporal data, such as tweets about mega-sporting events, has been accepted for publication in the official research journal of NASSM, the Journal of Sport Management.

Hoeber earned his PhD in computer science from the U of R in 2007. He was an Assistant Professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland from 2007 to 2012 before returning to the U of R’s Computer Science Department where he teaches and conducts research.