Engineering students set goals for academic year

By Costa Maragos Posted: August 4, 2017 6:00 a.m.

Members of the Regina Engineering Students’ Society with Dr. Esam Hussein, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. (front row l-r)  Kaylee Hayko, Maksym Zabutnyy and Emily Albano; Back row (L-R) Kennedy Dollard, Kailey Lowe, C M Shah Miraj, Kirsty Lewis, Brandon Clarke, Quinn Bast, Rishabh Dutta, Dr. Hussein, Tristan Heisler, Rooha Noor, Taylor Petrychyn and Emma Fraser.
Members of the Regina Engineering Students’ Society with Dr. Esam Hussein, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. (front row l-r) Kaylee Hayko, Maksym Zabutnyy and Emily Albano; Back row (L-R) Kennedy Dollard, Kailey Lowe, C M Shah Miraj, Kirsty Lewis, Brandon Clarke, Quinn Bast, Rishabh Dutta, Dr. Hussein, Tristan Heisler, Rooha Noor, Taylor Petrychyn and Emma Fraser. Photo courtesy of Jason Whitelaw

Kaylee Hayko has come to understand the joys and pressures of being an engineering student.

Hayko is entering her third year of Industrial Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and is vice-president communications for the Regina Engineering Students’ Society (RESS).

“As the years go on the work does get harder, I have found great joy in participating in events that the RESS has put on. It’s a good break from all of the studying,” says Hayko.

With that in mind, the group recently kicked off its 2017-2018 term with orientation and strategic planning sessions held at Living Skies Retreat Center in Lumsden, Sask.

“We feel we are on the right track. We’re doing things that will promote inclusivity among all students, and plan to make this year successful for everybody,” says Hayko.
 
At the retreat, the students have come up with a new mission statement with the goal of “to serve and advocate for our diverse students along with, promoting personal growth, professional development, and engineering spirit.”

Among the goals, the RESS is taking initiatives towards improving the mental health of engineering students.

“Engineering is a rewarding profession, but it can be mentally and emotionally taxing,” says Brittany Sippola, RESS Mental Health Director.

“At the RESS we want to be there for our students in every facet of their university career, and part of that is helping prevent stress and burnout.”

The group is also taking steps to combat academic misconduct among students.   

“The RESS has formed an Academic Integrity Committee and we’re working on getting recognized by the faculty as a group to send recommendations to Faculty Council about academic misconduct,” that sends recommendations to Faculty Council,” says Quinn Bast, Vice-President Academic for RESS. “We’re going to be asking for members beginning in the fall semester to become involved in this process.

Of course, RESS is planning many social events.

“We’re planning to host a variety of alcoholic and non-alcoholic events ranging from Beerfest to breakfast in the lounge,” says Anton Movchan, vice-president social at RESS.

The planning session in Lumsden included presentations from Dr. Esam Hussein, Dean of Engineering, representatives from the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan, Student Development Committee, Canadian Federation of Engineering Students, Western Engineering Students’ Societies Team, and University of Regina Students’ Union.

“We’re very excited to welcome the new students in the first year as well as all the returning students in the fall, says Maksym Zabutnyy, President of RESS. “I am extremely proud of this year’s council for dedicating its time to create a strategic plan and plan the upcoming year. With the RESS’ efforts and plans for the year, we hope our students will prepare for their professional obligations while having a meaningful university experience.”