Are Prisons Canada’s New Residential Schools? Stapleford Lecture examines racism in the justice system

Posted: March 19, 2018 6:00 a.m.

Nancy Macdonald’s reporting has garnered popular acclaim, as well a National Magazine Award and an award for Outstanding Journalism from the Canadian Association of Journalists.
Nancy Macdonald’s reporting has garnered popular acclaim, as well a National Magazine Award and an award for Outstanding Journalism from the Canadian Association of Journalists. Courtesy of the Faculty of Arts


The 2018 Stapleford Lecture at the University of Regina will feature Globe and Mail reporter Nancy Macdonald, whose award-winning reporting has highlighted the devastating degree to which Indigenous peoples are affected by racism and racialized violence, particularly in the Prairie provinces.

Macdonald will present a lecture entitled Are Prisons Canada’s New Residential Schools? on Wednesday, March 21 at 7:00 PM in the Research and Innovation Centre (RIC 119).

Her lecture will point to the surging incarceration rates of Indigenous people and explain how a biased justice system works against Indigenous accused at each step in the criminal process.

Writes Macdonald: ”From the moment they are first identified by police, to their appearance before a judge, to their hearing before a parole board - the ugly, current reality is that if you happen to be Indigenous, justice in Canada is not blind.”

Nancy McDonald
Globe and Mail journalist Nancy Macdonald.

Nancy Macdonald joined the Globe and Mail as a national reporter after 12 years at Maclean's magazine. She is well known for her reporting on Indigenous issues. She is the author of a Maclean’s feature story entitled ‘Welcome to Winnipeg: Where Canada’s Racism Problem is at its Worse’, which garnered national attention.

Another Maclean’s article helped highlight the disturbing fact of racism in the justice system – and forms the basis of her upcoming lecture at the U of R.

Her most recent reporting in the Globe and Mail has focused attention on the unresolved murder of Tina Fontaine, the Indigenous youth whose violent death helped mobilize a national inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Each year the Faculty of Arts presents the Stapleford Lecture in honour of Ernest William and Maude Bunting Stapleford. This endowment brings a distinguished lecturer to the U of R to speak in the area of human justice, the status of women, children’s care and education, the rights of disadvantaged groups, and/or the history and art of Saskatchewan.

This year, the Stapleford Lecture is part of a special event lineup for the University's first annual Equity Week (March 16-23). In partnership with multiple campus groups, Equity Week aims to highlight the issues and barriers faced by various members of the U of R community and collaborate on the ultimate goal of achieving equity for all.

Event:    2018 Stapleford Lecture
Date:      Wednesday, March 21
Time:      7:00 PM
Location: U of R Research and Innovation Centre, RIC 119

This event is free all are welcome. This is an accessible venue. Free parking on campus is available in Lot 16 and 17. Refreshments will be served following the lecture.